Prayer for Elderly Parents

Four Doctor Hiemstra
The Four Doctor Hiemstras

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Holy Father,

All praise and glory be to you for providing us faithful parents,

role models to guide us through the wilds of life

before we could tell our left hand from the right.

Thank you for their care, sacrifice, and wisdom—

may we be so caring, so willing to sacrifice, and so wise,

and forgive us when we are not!

Be with them when we are unable that they would never be alone.

Protect them from those that prey on the elderly, from unexpected accidents, and from needless worry.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, grant us the strength and wisdom to be worthy children and loving caregivers—

that we might enjoy our remaining times together and provide a role model to the young.

In Jesus precious name, Amen.

Prayer for Elderly Parents

Also see:

Family Prayer 

Giving Thanks 

A Place for Authoritative Prayer 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

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Teachers, Mentors, Friends, and Family

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Simple FaithBy Stephen W. Hiemstra

“And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding,
will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” (Phil 4:7)

We seldom learn alone. From a young age, we learn to take advice and our teachers, mentors, friends, and family guide and instruct us. We read: “Listen to advice and accept instruction, that you may gain wisdom in the future.” (Prov 19:20) While such advice may seem obvious, it frequently ignored. Many articles and studies cite few sources and give little evidence that they consulted anyone. A long list of references at the end of a report signals that the author has done his homework and can likely be trusted.

The first step in any research project is to consult the literature on the subject being studied. Few topics are truly new and, even when they are, prior research may have answered a similar question. Many academic fields of study invent entirely new terminology for what may be an ancient topic. This problem of new terminology may make a trip to the library (or to Google) seem pointless, but it points to the need to consult with advisers who can frame the proper terminology.

Resistance to consulting others frequently starts with pride or shame or the desire to take credit for the work. We may be too proud to ask for advice or be ashamed that we are not already experts on the subject. The desire to take credit for an innovation often motivates the keeping of secrets, but it also limits our productivity. A simple word of advice can eliminate many hours of searching and reduce the number of errors committed in the process. Working as a professional researcher, I often discovered in the final stages of a project a book or report that I wish that I had started with.

Of course, not all advisers can be trusted and ideas are frequently stolen. One reason for this problem arises because the hardest step in the scientific method is the problem definition. One of my most helpful professors used to add an additional step to the method before the problem definition: felt need.[1] A felt need reflects a concern without a clear idea of how usefully to frame the discussion. Once the problem is defined, the remainder of the research is a matter of filling in the blank. Thus, an adviser or a reviewer must be trusted enough to know that they will not steal an idea or, in an administrative context, take over (or kill)  your research project.

This problem is no different in a personal context. Sharing with a friend that you like someone entails the risk that they will realize that your relationship is uncertain and they could be emboldened to step in and initiate their own relationship. Talking about a job that you have applied for could invite competition or, alternatively, poisoning the well—your boss or co-workers may not want to see you advance or leave them.

Still, good friends and supportive colleagues will want you to be successful—to do your best work, to advance your career, and to find happiness. Working together and offering helpful advice speeds the learning process making life much more interesting. In fact, I frequently find prayer does exactly the same thing. When I take time to pray, often the first thing that happens is that God reminds me of something that I neglected to do—call a family member or take care of some unfinished business. With such insights revealed, I often sleep much better after evening prayers.

References

Johnson, Glenn L. 1986. Research Methodology for Economists: Philosophy and Practice. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company.

Footnotes

[1] Johnson lectured on felt needs but had not formulated the approach when he published his formal work (Johnson 1986, 15).

Teachers, Mentors, Friends, and Family

Also see:

A Roadmap of Simple Faith

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

A Place for Authoritative Prayer 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

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Johnson Writes About Pentecostals Ministering in Bad Prisons

Andrew JohnsonAndrew Johnson. 2017. If I Give My Soul: Faith Behind Bars in Rio de Janeiro. New York: Oxford.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

Confession time. I came to Christ through the testimony of a young and violent gang leader, Nicky Cruz, who came to Christ himself in the middle of a gang fight. His conversion took place in response to an Assembly of God (Pentecostal) mission in New York City.[1] Thus, the convergence of Pentecostalism and witness to violent young men played a key role in my own faith journey[2] so when I learned about Andrew Johnson’s book, If I Give My Soul: Faith Behind Bars in Rio de Janeiro,[3] I immediately ordered a copy.

Introduction

Johnson writes:

“Prison Pentecostalism represents a hidden but important part of the Pentecostal movement that has swept through Rio de Janeiro and much of Brazil over the past three decades. This book responds to a simple research question, ‘Why is Pentecostalism so widely practiced inside Rio de Janeiro’s prisons and jails?’” (4)

To find out, Johnson, a sociologist, spent two weeks living inside several jails in Rio de Janeiro and interviewed numerous prisoners and former prisoners. He observes:

“the prison churches not only survive but also thrive in this difficult space … because in many ways they resemble the prison gangs in structure and function. Both gang and prison church claim part of the prison as their own, each implements and enforces a set of rules for their members, and each provides a strong identity to participants and offers them protection and community.” (10-11)

What is perhaps most surprising is the level of respect afforded pastors among the poor generally, prisoners, and even the narco-gangs to the point that:

“gangs generally allow members to leave if they join a Pentecostal church as long as their conversion and subsequent [religious] practice are deemed genuine.” (10; 77).

This option is all the more striking because gang membership generally requires an oath of allegiance until death (“hasta la morgue”; 77), much like the MAFIA in North America. Similar rules and relationships with the Pentecostal churches have also been reported for Central American gangs, like Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13; 76-77)[4].

Pentecostals and Gangs

Obviously, the pastors and their church neither condone nor excuse violence or drug use. The support for prisoners in jail under the most inhumane conditions speaks loudly against the attitude that gang members are sub-human, “killable people” (“seres matáves”). Killable people in Rio de Janeiro are generally poor, unemployed, descendants of slaves who live in the “favelas” and who “Brazilians do not cry for” (39-61).

When Pentecostal pastors show up at the prison gates weekly with volunteers to provide food, clothing, medical supplies, and encouragement to prisoners packed so tightly that some must sleep standing up, they get noticed even if they preach against the very things that the gangs stand for—narcotics, sex trafficking, and violence. The respect that they earn is rooted in offering the prisoners something very basic—human dignity (85).

Pentecostals and Political Action

Although Pentecostal pastors are often maligned for not engaging in political action, Johnson writes:

“When the pastors embraced rapists, prayed with murderers, sang worship songs with drug dealers, and treated all the inmates as people endowed with inherent worth, they were participating in an activity that subverted the social order.” (165)

He coined the phrase “politics of presence” to describe how they have changed the dynamics of prison life and raised the awareness of the brutality of prison life when they preached back home in their congregations (143-166).

Assessment

Andrew Johnson’s book, If I Give My Soul: Faith Behind Bars in Rio de Janeiro, is a striking work. Clearly, his research transformed his own attitude about Pentecostals and reading it transformed mine. It is hard to be neutral about brutality, even if it takes place a world away and among people that are hard to love. This is a book likely to be talked widely for a long time. Read it if you dare.

References

Peterson, Eugene H. 2011. The Pastor: A Memoir. New York: HarperOne.

Wilkerson, David. 1962. The Cross and the Switchblade. Pyramid Communications.

Footnotes

[1]As an adult working in Hispanic ministry, I learned that Nicky Cruz was both Puerto Rican and a lifelong evangelist (Wilkerson).

[2]Although I then joined a Presbyterian church, one might describe me as a lifelong Presbycostal, a term that I first heard from Eugene Peterson (217).

[3]https://crcc.usc.edu/people/andrew-johnson.

[4]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS-13.

Johnson Writes About Pentecostals Ministering in Bad Prisons

Also see:

Tennant Highlights Five Gifts 

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2zRkNMJ

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Prayer for Teachers

Math teacher at Lee_HS
Math and Chemistry Teacher

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Heavenly Father:

We praise you for bringing good teachers into our lives.

Teachers that care, are well-trained, and work tirelessly to help us learn—

teachers better than we deserve!

Help us to listen to advice and accept instruction (Prov 19:20) and

teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom (Ps 90:12)

because we confess that we often tire of learning and spend too little time on it.

Thank you none-the-less for those that labor to instruct us

that we might mature into people of wisdom and faith, and

not stumble through life in ignorance for lack of guidance.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, enlighten our minds and open our hearts

that we might grow more like you day by day.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer for Teachers

Also see:

Giving Thanks 

A Place for Authoritative Prayer 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

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Chapter 22 of Revelation: Amen, Come, Lord Jesus!

CloudsBy Stephen W. Hiemstra

And the LORD God planted a garden in Eden, in the east, and there he put the man whom he had formed…The tree of life was in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. A river flowed out of Eden to water the garden (Gen 2:8-10).

What is your picture of heaven?

I think that rural people dream of a heavenly city while urban people long for the solitude of a garden. Here the Apostle John has a vision of a heavenly Zion with the garden of Eden planted right in the middle of it.

Yet it is the image of God himself that dominates John’s vision: The sun shall be no more your light by day, nor for brightness shall the moon give you light; but the LORD will be your everlasting light, and your God will be your glory (Isa 60:19). The headwaters of the river of life proceed precisely from God’s heavenly throne (v. 1).

Even here salvation is not universal. The angel says: Let the evildoer still do evil, and the filthy still be filthy, and the righteous still do right, and the holy still be holy (v. 11). Our own hearts testify to the judgment that awaits us if we forsake the Lord by our actions.

For example, do we long for, like John: Come, Lord Jesus (v. 20)? Or is our lament reserved for the latest Apple IPhone?

Judgment does not escape those who arrogantly add and subtract from these prophecies—plagues are decreed! False teachers beware! Even Balaam refused to prophesy for love of money or to curse God’s chosen (Num 24:10). Are we as wise?

Revelation is not a book to be read with a spirit of complacency. We are presented with stark images and hard choices. Our guidance is, however, simple:

Blessed is the one who keeps the words of the prophecy of this book (v. 7).

Questions

1. Describe the river of life. What is significant about it? (vv 1-2)
2. What curse are we talking about in verse 3? (Hint: Genesis 2:16-17)
3. How do you know you are saved? (v 4)
4. What is the significance of God providing the light in heaven and the absence of night? (v 5)
5. What is true? Who is blessed? (vv 6-7)
6. What mistake does John make a second time? Why is it important to know? (vv 8-9)
7. Who is the angel and what does he say? (vv 10-20)
8. What is odd about verse 11?
9. What does the word, recompense, mean or imply? (v 12)
10. What does Jesus say about time? How do you interpret it? (v 13)
11. What is the warning about adding and subtracting? (vv 18-19) Who is Balaam? (Num 24:10)
12.What is your favorite picture of heaven? Why?
13.What questions would you like to pose about the Book of Revelation?

Chapter 22 of Revelation: Amen, Come, Lord Jesus!

Also see:

Chapter 21 of Revelation: Home Sweet Home 

Chapter 1: Alpha and Omega 

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

 

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Tennant Highlights Five Gifts

Carolyn Tennant, Catch the Wind of the SpiritCarolyn Tennant. 2016. Catch the Wind of the Spirit: How the 5 Ministry Gifts Can Transform Your Church. Springfield: Vital Resources.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

Statistical estimates show that Pentecostals (including Charismatics) are one of the fastest growing Christian groups. Their growth through evangelism in Asia, Africa, and Latin America swamps that of North American and Western European Christian groups that appear to be in decline.[1] While such statistics can explain what has happened, theology is required to explain why.

Introduction

In her book, Catch the Wind of the Spirit, Carolyn Tennant points in an interesting direction, writing:

“Catch the Wind of the Spirit grew out of the context of need and emanated from a deep study of Ephesians 4. After pondering the five ministry gifts for years, I’ve come to the conclusion that our emphasis has been all wrong. The vast majority of teaching on this has focused on church leadership. I’m firmly convinced, however, that God is focused upon the ministry currents that each person is supposed to oversee. He means for the whole church to get involved.” (5)

Currents Demonstrate God’s Power

Tennant focuses on “currents” as a concept in the electrical sense, where God himself provides the power that flows through believers to accomplish his will for our lives and the lives of those we come into contact with. The “currents” of evangelist, teacher, pastor, prophet, and apostle (6-7) are in view here and are certainly not titles of church leaders in the manner that she uses them. Clearly, Tennant’s focus on the work of the Holy Spirit, as suggested by her title, marks her as a Pentecostal.

Tennant cites an old Yiddish proverb: “If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans.” (16) She then begins her exposition with a curious analogy for being led by the spirit offered by the early Celtic church. Celtic monks would sail in coracles, small boats shaped like a walnut, taking neither a rudder not paddles, but allowing the wind to blow them where it may: “believing that God would take them where they were supposed to go to share the gospel.” (9) The idea of current is also analogous to flow of water as it, much like the wind, carries a coracle along.

Ephesians 4

The key verses in Tennant’s exegesis are:

“And He gave some as apostles, and some as prophets, and some as evangelists, and some as pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of service…” (Eph 4:11-12 NAU) [2]

Tennant highlights the verb, gave, making the point that these currents inform the ministry of the entire church; they are not titles given to leaders set apart from the body of the church to undertaken these currents independent of the church (26-27).

Structure of the Book

Tennant structures the chapters of her book around five pairs of discussions. In each discussion, she first introduces a chapter on a current; then she follows that current with a discussion of the leadership role that focuses on that current. In the first pair, she writes about the “Powerful Wooing Current”, then discusses the role of an Evangelist. The second pair starts with the “Radical Forming Current” and is followed by a discussion of the Teacher. These five pairs therefore outline ten chapters with summary material before and after for a total of fourteen chapters.

Example of The Radical Forming Current

Because my own ministry focuses on teaching, Tennant fascinated me with her outline of sixteen different roles where teaching was the primary focus. They are: counselor, mentor, life coach, facilitator, luncheon discussion, training leaders, leading a new converts class, blogging, leading workshops, leading Sunday school, leading retreats, youth ministry, facilitating small groups, Bible quizzes, leading a men’s or women’s group, developing curriculum, and teaching seminary students (78-79). Tennant admits that her listing is incomplete, yet she shows that teaching goes beyond Sunday school. A lot of teaching takes place, for example, in a thoughtful sermon.

Assessment

Carolyn Tennant[3] is an adjunct professor at the Assembly of God Theological Seminary in Springfield, Missouri and professor emerita from North Central University in Minneapolis. Her doctorate is in Educational Administration and Supervision, University of Colorado at Boulder. Carolyn Tennant’s Catch the Wind of the Spirit highlights the work of the Holy Spirit. This is through the Christian church from a Pentecostal perspective based on an exegesis of Ephesians 4. Because the Pentecostal church has grown rapidly over the past century, we might be led to believe that it has done a better job of balancing the five gifts of the spirit than other Christian groups.

Footnotes

[1] Status of Global Christianity, 2017, in the Context of 1900–2050. Summary Data Abstracted from: Todd M. Johnson and Gina A. Zurlo, eds. World Christian Database (Leiden/Boston: Brill, accessed October 2016), www.worldchristiandatabase.org.

[2] The underlying Greek manuscripts offer no punctuation, but scholars have offered their best guess and the English translation offers a second guess.

[3] https://www.linkedin.com/in/carolyn-tennant-58209452. @CaTennant

Tennant Highlights Five Gifts

Also see:

Books, Films, and Ministry

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer for the Kids

Mr Personality, Photo by Stephen W. Hiemstra
Mr Personality, Photo by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Almighty father,

We praise you for creating us, male and female, in your image (Gen 1:27)

so that in Christ there is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female. (Gal 3:28 ESV)

We confess that we have not always lived into your image promise or even wanted to.

We give thanks that you have not given up on us, but sent Christ to show us how to live,

ransomed us from our own sinful folly, and given us the hope of salvation and eternal life with you.

We pray that our kids will remember the lessons that we so painfully learned,

but mostly that we learned to trust in you.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, grant us the strength to continue living another year,

the grace to reach out to those around us, and

the peace that passes all understanding (Phil 4:7).

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer for the Kids

 Also see:

Giving Thanks 

A Place for Authoritative Prayer 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

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Chapter 21 of Revelation: Home Sweet Home

CloudsBy Stephen W. Hiemstra

For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth, and
the former things shall not be remembered or come into mind…
The wolf and the lamb shall graze together;
the lion shall eat straw like the ox, and dust shall be the serpent’s food.
They shall not hurt or destroy in all my holy mountain,”
says the LORD (Isa 65:17-25).

Home! Sweet Home! is the name of hit song written in New York City by John Howard Payne in 1822. Then as now, for most of us nothing is so sweet as place where we grew up—even if only because we possess a selective memory! And God knows this! So the vision of heaven given in Revelation is familiar, yet different in exceeding expectations!

So we groan for our redemption and all of creation groans with us (Romans 8:22-23). As the Apostle Paul reminds us: our citizenship is in heaven (Phil 3:20). Here on earth we are sojourners, travelers, exiles—not even permanent residents! (1 Peter 2:11). So in Revelation 21, we get a glimpse of our eternal home.

Heaven in John’s vision is the new Jerusalem. For Isaiah, the dream of a new Jerusalem had an earthly address—a place where the Babylonian destruction would become a distant memory. In John, the new Jerusalem also had an earthly address—a place where the Roman destruction would become a distant memory.

For us the new Jerusalem does not have an earthly address, but is truly an answer to the prophecy: And I will walk among you and will be your God, and you shall be my people (Lev 26:12). The presence of God is transformative: heaven is a radiant cube lit by the glory of God and watered from the spring of life freely given (Rev 21:6, 11, 23).

In verses 15-17, we see an angel again with a measuring rod, much like in Ezekiel 40-42. The purpose is not stated but may be to show the heavenly city dwarfs earthly imitations in size and splendor. For it houses the redeemed of all eternity.

This week I attended the funeral of the son of a close friend. In the eulogy, the pastor read from the Gospel of John: In my Father’s house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? (John 14:2)

Our comfort with John 14 arises not because we gain a new address or get a glimpse of the real estate, but because we know that God will finally reveal his full glory. And: he will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore (Rev 21:4).

Knowing who God is, how he keeps his promises, and how life’s story truly ends, our joy is complete even in the presence of death.

Questions

1. Why does John say that the sea had passed away? (v. 1)
2. How does John describe the new heaven? (vv. 1-2)
3. What are the attributes of a new bride that are similar to heaven? (v. 2)
4. What are 5 things that are special about heaven? (vv. 3-7)
5. Who are excluded from heaven and what is their fate? (v. 8)
6. What does heaven look like? (vv. 10-1, 16-21)
7. What is missing from heaven? (vv. 22-23)
8. What is the effect of heaven on the nations? (vv. 24-27)

Chapter 21 of Revelation: Home Sweet Home

Also see:

Chapter 20 of Revelation: The Binding, Millennium, and Judgment 

Chapter 1: Alpha and Omega 

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2jaUhI7

 

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Pettrey Explores Forgiveness

Dani Pettrey's SubmergedDani Pettrey. 2012. Submerged. Minneapolis: Bethany House Publishers.[1]

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

What does it mean to be forgiven? Which is more important, the forgiveness of God, forgiveness of those offended, or forgiveness of yourself? What makes forgiveness real? Sometimes the journeys that we take are not the trips that we plan.

In Dani Pettry’s novel, Submerged, we meet a beautiful and talented young woman, Bailey Craig, with a history. Bailey returns to the small town in Alaska where she grew up to bury her beloved aunt Agnes, who died in plane crash, and settle her aunt’s estate. As the days tick by, Bailey runs into her high school flame, Cole McKenna, who has not forgotten her and is now a deputy sheriff, and they both learn that the plane crash that killed her aunt was no accident. As other murders are uncovered, we learn that solving the murders requires detailed knowledge of Alaska’s Russian history that only Bailey poses. Will Bailey stay to face her past and find her aunt’s murderer or run away, as she did so many years ago? The answer depends on the depth of her experience of forgiveness.

Alaskan History

The backdrop of Pettrey’s romantic suspense is modern Alaska. In 1867, U.S. Secretary of State William H. Steward negotiated the purchase of Alaska from Russia. The purchase added 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km2) of new territory to the United States, but was ridiculed in the Congress as Steward’s Folly. Later gold and oil deposits were discovered and the Alaskan purchase proved wise indeed. Alaska became a state in 1959.[2]

Dani Pettrey

Dani Pettrey writes inspirational romantic suspense and has nine published titles.[3] She lives with her husband, two daughters, and son-in-law in Maryland. Submerged was her first published title in 2012.

Dani and I met in October at a conference of the American Christian Fiction Writers’ Association[4] in Woodbridge, Virginia. Intrigued, I later ordered a copy of Submerged online.

Assessment

In Dani Pettry’s novel, Submerged, proved hard to put down. The storyline is fresh, credible, and cannot be anticipated; her characters are flawed, but live life deeply and struggle in overcoming their afflictions. I cried my way through the last couple chapters. Perhaps you will too.

Footnotes

[1] http://bakerpublishinggroup.com/bethanyhouse

[2} https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Purchase.

[3] Submerged (2012), Shattered (2013), Stranded (2013), Silenced (2014), Sabotaged (2015),  Shadowed (2016), Cold Shot (2016), Still Life (2017), and Sins of the Past (2016).  https://www.DaniPettrey.com.

[4] https://acfwvirginia.com.

Pettrey Explores Forgiveness

Also see:

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2zRkNMJ

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New Year’s Prayer (2)

fpca_cross

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Merciful father, Light of the World, Spirit of Truth,

Thank you for the gift of life, time to enjoy, and the many blessings that we take for granted.

Forgive us for our wasting of your gifts, for the sins that we willfully commit, and for the good things that we forget to do.

Have mercy on us.

Cast out the demons that torment us, the desires that demean us, and spirits that hide us from the truth.

Be especially near.

Help us to reflect on our weaknesses, our sinful behavior, and our neglectful hearts.

Grant us strength to meet the challenges of the new year and the grace to extend our blessings to those around us.

In Jesus’s precious name, Amen

New Year’s Prayer (2)

Also see:

Christmas Prayer 

How do Christians Connect with God? (2) 

Blackaby Expects Answers to Prayer 

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2fEPbBK

 

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