Bell Revises with Care

Bell_review_20201008

James Scott Bell. 2008. Revision & Self-Editing: Techniques for Transforming Your First Draft into a Finished Novel. Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest Books.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

It is often asserted that writing is a right-brain (creative) activity and editing is a left-brain (analytical) activity. While I doubt that any writers have been observed under CAT scanning device, the observation has an intuitive appeal and is repeated ad nauseum in books on writing. In my case, I generally find myself plumbing the depths of books on writing mostly as I contemplate another round of editing, both to garner new insights and to gather motivation to jump into editing one more time. James Scott Bell writing books (see references) provide reliable fodder for both needs.

Introduction

In his book, Revision & Self-Editing: Techniques for Transforming Your First Draft into a Finished Novel, James Scott Bell describes how to use his book in two parts

“In Part 1: Self-Editing, we will be covering a broad range of fiction technique, with exercises—a sort of writing boot camp … [Part 2] offers a systematic approach to revising a novel.” (5)

Dedicated James Scott Bell fans will recognize Part 1 as an overview of different writing books that he has written previously and he covers much the same topics. The rubber hits the road with a splash in chapter 16, the Ultimate Revision Checklist, where he revisits each topic in Part 1 with specific advice on editing and revising manuscripts focusing on specific problems in those topic areas. If we read in Part 1 that “fiction is the record of how a character faces a threat or challenge” (18), then in Part 2 he advises us to “track the inner change in your character through the three acts” with a “character arc template” (219) that demonstrates how the character grows in response to the threat or challenge. There is method to the madness here.

Background and Organization

On his website, we read:

Jim has taught writing at Pepperdine University and at numerous writers conferences in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand. He attended the University of California, Santa Barbara where he studied writing with Raymond Carver, and graduated with honors from the University of Southern California Law Center.[1] 

In addition to his writing books, he is known for writing thrillers, television appearances, and legal work.

Bell writes in sixteen chapters, divided into two parts:

Part One: Self Editing

  1. A Philosophy of Self-Editing
  2. Characters
  3. Plot & Structure
  4. Point of View
  5. Scenes
  6. Dialogue
  7. Beginnings, Middles, and Ends
  8. Show versus Tell
  9. Voice & Style
  10. Setting & Description
  11. Exposition
  12. Theme

Part Two: Revision

  1. A Philosophy of Revision
  2. Before You Revise
  3. The First Read-Through
  4. The Ultimate Revision Checklist (vi-vii)

These chapters are preceded by an introduction and followed by an epilogue, appendix, and Index. This book is part of the Write Great Fiction series published by Writer’s Digest Books.

 Self-Editing

Bell asserts that 99.9 percent of self-published authors need to learn how to self-edit better. He defines self-editing as: “the ability to know what makes fiction work, so when you actually write (as in a first-draft) you’re crafting salable fiction.” (8) Because more than a million books are published annually and readership appears to be declining, writing is a highly competitive activity. Self-publishing has contributed to this outcome, which makes it unlikely that most authors will not be offered an editor to work with and bookshelf space on which to sell their books. Thus, good self-editing skills are a must for most writers.

Outside of the environment in which we labor, editing becomes necessary once a first draft is produced. If writing is a right-brain activity, then most first drafts will resemble a brainstorming with some structure. This implies that editing is required to develop characters, fill in descriptive details, and generally make things hold together. In my own novella project in September, on first read I found conflicting details about a minor character in my first draft, a product of my own poor memory—an obvious incentive to edit even my edits.

Revision

Bell observes: “Submitting a novel without rewriting is like playing ice hockey naked.” (192) In a nutshell, you can play hockey naked, but you probably don’t want to!

Bell sees professional authors as the one taking the long view: “Ultimate success involves a long curve of learning, working, failure, trying again, patience, and perseverance.” (194) Personally, I have found professional are the ones who are constantly learning new techniques and looking for mentors to ease the process. It is the difference between those seeking a job and those desiring a career—only the latter effectively learn the craft.

 Assessment

James Scott Bell’s Revision & Self-Editing: Techniques for Transforming Your First Draft into a Finished Novel stands out as a good summary of his collective wisdom as a writer and a must-read for fiction authors. I especially enjoyed his advice to write a “pet the dog” beat to deeper the identity of you lead character. For Bell, writers are the ones who ceaselessly learn more about writing. What dog can’t you not pet?

Footnotes

[1] https://www.jamesscottbell.com.

References

Bell, James Scott.  2004.  Plot and Structure:  Techniques and Exercises for Crafting a Plot that Grips Readers from Start to Finish.  Cincinnati:  Writer’s Digest Books. (review)

Bell, James Scott. 2014. How to Write Dazzling Dialogue: The Fastest Way to Improve Any Manuscript. Woodland Hills, CA: Compendium Press. (review)

Bell, James Scott. 2019. The Last Fifty Pages: The Art and Craft of Unforgettable Endings. Woodland Hills, CA: Compendium Press. (review.

Bell Revises with Care

Also see:

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

 

 

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Spirituality: Monday Monologues (podcast) November 23, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on the Christian Spirituality. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Spirituality: Monday Monologues (podcast) November 23, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer Day 1

Cover, A Christian Guide to Spirituality

By Stephen W. HIemstra

Almighty Father:

thank you for the person of Jesus of Nazareth;

who lived as a role model for sinners;

who died as a ransom for sin;

and whose resurrection gives us the hope of salvation.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, inspire the words written and illumine the words read.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer Day 1

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Purchase Book: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

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Oración Dia 1

Cubierta por Una Guia Cristian a la Espiritualidad

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Padre Todopoderoso,

gracias por la persona de Jesús de Nazaret,

quien vivió como un modelo a seguir para los pecadores,

quien murió como un rescate por los pecados,

y cuya resurrección nos da la esperanza de salvación.

En el poder del Espíritu Santo, inspira las palabras escritas e ilumina las palabras leídas.

En el nombre de Jesús. Amén.

Oración Dia 1

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

Otras formas de participar en línea:

Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Comprar Libro: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Gebetstag 1

Ein Christlicher Leitfaden zur Spiritualität, 20201014

Von Stephen W. Hiemstra

Allmächtiger Vater:

Danke für die Person Jesu von Nazareth;

die als Vorbild für Sünder lebten;

der als Lösegeld für die Sünde starb;

und dessen Auferstehung gibt uns die Hoffnung auf Erlösung.

Inspiriere in der Kraft deines Heiligen Geistes die geschriebenen Worte und erleuchte die gelesenen Worte.

In Jesus Namen, Amen.

Gebetstag 1

Siehe auch:

Glaubens Gebet 

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Why is Spirituality Important?

Cover, A Christian Guide to Spirituality

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

“Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life.

No one comes to the Father except through me.’” (John 14:6 ESV)

Some questions defy pat answers: Who is God? Who am I? What must I do? How do I know?

African Runners

At one point in world competition among marathon runners, Ethiopians ruled. The Kenyans had talent, but Ethiopians trained harder and trained better. Training at high altitudes built their strength; training as a team built their competitiveness.

Africans were not always allowed to compete in these games. The right to compete did not come all at once, but it started with efforts to abolish slavery. William Wilberforce, a devout Christian, spent most of his life leading the effort to abolish slavery in nineteenth century Great Britain. He later wrote about the need for spiritual training saying:

no one expects to attain the height of learning, or arts, or power, or wealth, or military glory, without vigorous resolution, and strenuous diligence, and steady perseverance. Yet we expect to be Christians without labor, study, or inquiry. (Wilberforce 2006, 5–6)

Spiritual Journey

Wilberforce must have had me in mind. For years, I professed Christ as savior but did not embrace him as Lord. My faith was incomplete. As I learned to apply the lordship of Christ to my life, I experienced a more sustained sense of Christian joy.

The content of faith is critical. “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.” (Heb 11:1) If I have faith that eggshells are white, I have only defined eggshell color. But, if I have faith that Christ rose from the dead, my whole world changes—God exists and death no longer has the final word. The call to faith defines our identity in Christ.[1]

Postmodern Dilemma

The idea of Christian faith has become unfashionable. The postmodern world we live in is often like the Sahara desert where mountains of sand blow about daily. Direction in a world of shifting sand requires a surveyor’s marker that establishes location. Standing on a marker, a map shows both direction and distance. Without the marker, however, a map becomes a puzzle—like words without definitions—whose pieces have meaning only relative to one another. Scripture is our map; our marker is Jesus Christ[2].

The sun does not always shine; neither does it rain every day. Spirituality is living out what we know to be true on good days and bad.

[1] “Through the CALL of Jesus men become individuals. Whilly-nilly, they are compelled to decide, and that decision can only be made by themselves.” (Bonhoeffer 1995, 94).

[2] Benner (2002, 26) sees the role of a spiritual director as of pointing to God’s work in a person’s life.

References

Benner, David G. 2203. Sacred Companions: The Gift of Spiritual Friendship & Direction. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Books.

Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. 1995. The Cost of Discipleship (Orig. pub. 1937). New York: Simon and Schuster.

Wilberforce, William. 2006. A Practical View of Christianity (Orig. pub. 1797). Ed. Kevin Charles Belmonte. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Christian Classics; Hendrickson Publishers.

Why is Spirituality Important?

Also see:

Preface to A Christian Guide to Spirituality

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¿Por qué Consideramos la Espiritualidad Importante?

Cubierta por Una Guia Cristian a la Espiritualidad
Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Jesús le dijo : “Yo soy el camino, y la verdad, y la vida; nadie viene al Padre sino por mí.” (Juan 14:6)

Revisitamos unas prequeguntas muchas veces durante la vida:  Quien es Dios?  Quien somos nosotros?  Que debemos hacer?  ¿Cómo lo sabemos?

Antes pocos anos en la competencia global entre corredores de maratón, etíopes gobernaron.

Corredores keniatas tenían talento, pero los etíopes capacitados más fuerte y mejor preparados.  Capacitación a gran altura construido fuerza; Capacitación como un equipo de unidad construyó competitividad.

Pero los africanos no siempre se les permitió competir en partidos internacionales. El derecho de competir no venia solo en un día, pero se empezar con la lucha contra la esclavitud.

William Wilberforce, un Cristiano devote, dedicaba casi la vida entera suya en la lucha por abolir la esclavitud durante la siglo XIX en Gran Bretaña.

Más tarde escribia sobre la necessidad de la formacíon espiritual, diciendo:

nadie espera que para alcanzar la altura de aprendizaje, o las artes, o el poder, ni la riqueza, ni gloria militar, sin resolución vigorosa, y la diligencia extenuante, y la perseverancia constante. Sin embargo, esperamos ser cristianos sin trabajo, estudio o investigación. (Wilberforce 2006, 5–6)

Wilberforce debe haber estar pensando de mí.  Por muchos anos, yo habia profesado Cristo como Salvador, pero no como Señor. Mi fe estaba incompleto.  Más tarde, cuando me enteré de aplicar la soberanía de Cristo en mi vida, comencé a experimentar el gozo sostenido cristiano.

El contento de fe es fundamental.  “Ahora bien, la fe es la certeza de lo que se espera, la convicción de lo que no se ve.” (Heb 11:1 LBA)  Si tengo fe que cáscaras de huevo son blanco, define solamente el colour de las cáscaras.  Pero, si tengo fe en que Cristo resucitó de entre los muertos, mi perspectiva cambia por complete—Dios existe y la muerte no tiene la última palabra larga. El llamado de fe define nuestra identidad en Cristo[1].

La idea de fe Crista se ha convertido fuera de moda. El mundo posmoderno en que vivimos es a menudo como el desierto del Sahara, donde las montañas de arena golpe alrededor cotidiana.  Direcciones en un mundio de arena cambiante requieren un marcador del topógrafo a determinar posición. De pie sobre marcador del topógrafo, la mapa mostrara direccion y del distancia.  Sin el marcador, sin embargo, una mapa estaria ser una rompecabeza—como palabras sin definiciones—donde sus piezas tenian sentido solamente una contra la otra.  Las escrituras es nuestro mapa; nuestro marcador del topógrafo es Jesuscristo[2].

El sol no brillo cotidiana; tampoco no lluvia cada dia. La espiritualidad es viviendo la verdad que sabemos por días buenos y días malos.

[1] “Through the CALL of Jesus men become individuals. Whilly-nilly, they are compelled to decide, and that decision can only be made by themselves.” (Bonhoeffer 1995, 94).

[2] Benner (2002, 26) vea el papel de un director espiritual como a apuntar al obra de Dios en la vida personal.

Referencias

Benner, David G. 2203. Sacred Companions: The Gift of Spiritual Friendship & Direction. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Books.

Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. 1995. The Cost of Discipleship (Orig. pub. 1937). New York: Simon and Schuster.

Wilberforce, William. 2006. A Practical View of Christianity (Orig. pub. 1797). Ed. Kevin Charles Belmonte. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Christian Classics; Hendrickson Publishers.

¿Por qué Consideramos la Espiritualidad Importante

Ver también:

Prefacio de La Guía Cristiana a la Espiritualidad 

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Warum ist Spiritualität Wichtig?

Ein Christlicher Leitfaden zur Spiritualität, 20201014

Von Stephen W. Hiemstra

Jesus spricht zu ihm: Ich bin der Weg und die Wahrheit und das Leben; niemand kommt zum Vater denn durch mich. (Jn 14:6)

Einige Fragen haben keine einfachen Antworten: Wer ist Gott? Wer sind wir? Was sollen wir machen? Wie wissen wir?

An einem Punkt im Weltwettbewerb unter Marathonläufern herrschten Äthiopier. Die Kenianer hatten Talent, aber die Äthiopier trainierten härter und besser. Die Ausbildung in großen Höhen stärkte die; Die Ausbildung als einer Mannschaft stärkte ihre Wettbewerbsfähigkeit.

Die Afrikaner durften nicht immer an diesen Spielen teilnehmen. Das Recht zu konkurrieren kam nicht auf einmal, aber es begann mit den Bemühungen, die Sklaverei abzuschaffen. William Wilberforce, ein frommer Christ, verbrachte den größten Teil seines Lebens als Leiter damit, die Sklaverei im Großbritannien des neunzehn Jahrhunderts abzuschaffen. Später schrieb er über die Notwendigkeit einer spirituellen Ausbildung und sagte:

Niemand erwartet, die Höhe des Verständnises oder der Künste oder der Macht oder des Reichtums oder des militärischen Ruhms zu erreichen, ohne stärke Entschlossenheit, anstrengenden Fleiß und beständige Ausdauer. Wir erwarten jedoch, Christen zu werden, ohne Arbeit, Studium, oder Forschung (Wilberforce 2006, 5–6).

Wilberforce muss mich im Sinn gehabt haben. Ich habe mich jahrelang zu Christus als Retter bekannt, ihn aber nicht als Herrn angenommen. Mein Glaube war unvollständig 

Als ich lernte, die Herrschaft Christi auf mein Leben anzuwenden, erlebte ich ein nachhaltigeres Gefühl christlicher Freude.

Der Inhalt des Glaubens ist kritisch. “Es ist aber der Glaube eine feste Zuversicht dessen, was man hofft, und ein Nichtzweifeln an dem, was man nicht sieht.”  (Heb. 11:1) Wenn ich glaube, daß Eierschalen weiß sind, habe ich nur die Eierschalenfarbe definiert. Aber wenn ich glaube, daß Christus von den Toten auferstanden ist, verändert sich meine ganze Welt—Gott existiert und der Tod hat nicht mehr das letzte Wort. Der Ruf zum  Glauben definiert unsere Identität in Christus (Bonhoeffer 1995, 94).

Die Idee des christlichen Glaubens ist unmodern geworden. Die postmoderne Welt, in der wir leben, ist oft wie die Sahara, in der täglich Sandberge rund wehen. Die Richtung in einer Welt mit sich bewegendem Sand erfordert einen Vermessungsmarker, der den Standort festlegt. Auf einer Markierung stehend zeigt eine Landkarte sowohl Richtung als auch Entfernung. Ohne den Marker wird eine Landkarte jedoch zu einem Puzzle—wie Wörter ohne Definitionen—deren Teile nur relativ zueinander eine Bedeutung haben. Die Schrift ist unsere Landkarte; unser Marker ist Jesus Christus (Benner 2002, 26).

Die Sonne scheint nicht immer; es regnet auch nicht jeden Tag. Die Spiritualität lebt das aus, von dem wir wissen, dass es an guten und an schlechten Tagen wahr ist.

Fußnoten

1“no one expects to attain the height of learning, or arts, or power, or wealth, or military glory, without vigorous resolution, and strenuous diligence, and steady perseverance. Yet we expect to be Christians without labor, study, or inquiry.” (Wilberforce 2006, 5–6)

Verweise

Benner, David G. 2203. Sacred Companions: The Gift of Spiritual Friendship & Direction. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Books.

Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. 1995. The Cost of Discipleship (Orig. pub. 1937). New York: Simon and Schuster.

Wilberforce, William. 2006. A Practical View of Christianity (Orig. pub. 1797). Ed. Kevin Charles Belmonte. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Christian Classics; Hendrickson Publishers.

Siehe auch:

Einleitung auf Ein Christlicher Leitfaden zur Spiritualität 

Andere Möglichkeiten, sich online zu engagieren:

Autoren Seite: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

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Mitteilungsblatt:  https://bit.ly/Thanks_2020

 

 

 

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Friedman: Families Matter

Friedman_review_20200713

Edwin H. Friedman.  1985.  Generation to Generation:  Family Process in Church and Synagogue.  New York:  Gilford Press [1].

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

Families matter more than normal (individualistic) intuition suggests.  A death in the family may leave one person with chronic migraine headaches; another may develop back pain or experience a heart attack; a third may exhibit psychiatric dysfunction.  A medical doctor or counselor treating only an individual’s symptoms may not have a high degree of success because the cause of the symptoms lies in the family system, not the individual.  While pastors and chaplains may not be surprised by this observation, standard medical and counseling training and practices focuses almost exclusively on the individual.

Introduction

A relatively new field of counseling, family systems counseling, looks at the family as an emotional system.  What matters in family systems is not so much individual behavior, but how individuals in the family interact with one another.  Because any emotionally connected group—an office, business, or church—behaves in much the same way, family systems analysis has wide applicability.  Edwin Friedman’s book, Generation to Generation:  Family Process in Church and Synagogue, is probably the best known book in this field.

Five Concepts

Friedman outlines 5 basic concepts in family systems theory, including:

  1. The identified patient;
  2. The concept of balance (homeostasis);
  3. Differentiation of self;
  4. The extended family field; and
  5. Emotional triangles (19).

Each of these concepts deserves discussion.

The Identified Patient

Symptoms arise in a family system first in the weakest members of the system.  This unconscious scapegoating effect arises, in part, because they are least able to cope with problems elsewhere in the system like plumbing subject to excessive water pressure (21).  For example, a child may act out (nail biting, bed-wetting, fighting in school, teenage troubles, etc) because the parents have marital difficulties.  Focusing on the child may simply make the problem worse, while counseling the parents may not only resolve the marital difficulties, but the child’s issue as well.

Balance

The family emotional system strives to maintain equilibrium (resist change) having an effect not unlike a thermostat.  When problems surface, questions according arise like:  what is out of equilibrium?  Why now? (24)  Ironically, familiar dysfunction may be preferred to therapeutic change (25).  Dynamic stability may accordingly be attained, in part, by how loosely or tightly individuals respond to changes.  Friedman classifies families as acting more like a serial (tightly integrated) or parallel (loosely integrated) electrical system (25-26).  Families that are loosely integrated exhibit a greater capacity to absorb stress simply because they are less reactive to the stress.

Differentiation of Self

According to Friedman:  Differentiation means the capacity to be an “I” while remaining connected.  Differentiation increases the shock-absorbing capacity of the system by loosening the integration.  The ideal here is to remain engaged in the system but in an non-reactive manner—a nonanxious presence (27).  Great self-differentiation offers the opportunity for the entire system to change by reducing the automatic resistance to change posed by homeostasis (29).  Family leaders (including pastors in church families) who develop greater self-differentiation can accordingly bring healing in the face of challenges (30-31).  This is a principle that can aid leaders in many a dysfunctional organization [2].

Extended Family Field

Understanding one’s extended family and family history can identify unresolved issues and repeating patterns.  The principle is that one cannot solve a family system’s problem by withdrawing temporally or geographically—in such events we simply take our issues with us.  Such problems have a nasty habit of reappearing kind of like genetic diseases transmitted by DNA.  Friedman (32) observes that:  family trees are always trees of knowledge and often they are also trees of life.  This re-emergence of family systems problems across time and distance extends the principle of homeostasis.

Emotional Triangles

Friedman (35) writes:  An emotional triangle is formed by any three persons or issues…when any two parts of a system become uncomfortable with one another, they will “triangle in” or focus on a third person, or issue, as a way of stabilizing their own relationship with one another. This has the effect of putting stress on that third person to balance the system.  An unsuspecting pastor could, of course, end up participating in many such triangles and simply burn out.  This leads Friedman to observe that: stress is less the result of quantitative notion such as “overwork” and more the effect of our position in the triangle of our families (1).

The importance of the pastor’s stance in a church family is immediately obvious in this framework.  The pastor functions as a parent in the church family system.  Problems in the pastor’s family of origin have the potential to transmit immediately into the church family because of the pastor’s key role in the system.  Likewise, the pastor can also be easily triangled into families within the church family if the pastor is not a nonanxious presence within the system.  Homeostasis can leave a new pastor vulnerable to dysfunction in a church years after the apparent source of the problem, perhaps a prior pastor, has left.

What is fascinating about this line of thought is that, unlike in theories of culture, much of this activity is subconscious—a kind of emotional twin to the thought processes involved in discussions of culture.

Family Therapy

Friedman wrote having worked as family therapist and ordained Jewish Rabbi for more than 30 years in the Washington DC metro area.  He writes in 12 chapters divided into 4 sections preceded by an introduction and followed by a bibliographic and index.  The chapter titles are:

  1. The Idea of a Family;
  2. Understanding Family Process;
  3. The Marital Bond;
  4. Child-focused Families;
  5. Body and Soul in the Family Process;
  6. When the Parent Becomes a Child;
  7. A Family Approach to Life-Cycle Ceremonies;
  8. Family Process and Organizational Life;
  9. Leadership and Self in a Congregational Family;
  10. Leaving and Entering a Congregational Family;
  11. The Immediate Family:  Conflict and Traps; and
  12. The Extended Family:  Its Potential for Salvation (ix-x).

Although Generation to Generation is a textbook, it is a fascinating read—Friedman is famous for his story-telling and he wrote another book, Friedman’s Fables (New York:  Gilford Press, 2014), which focuses more explicitly on the stories.

Assessment

Applying Friedman’s principles in my own family life has brought enormous healing.  My seminary training, for example, worked to increase my level of self-differentiation within my family which is very close (fused in Friedman’s terminology).  This book is well worth the time and effort to read and study.  The life you save may be your own.

[1] www.Guilford.com.

[2] An entire book has been focused on this same principle:  Ronald A. Heifetz and Marty Linsky. 2002.  Leadership on the Ling:  Staying Alive through the Dangers of Leading.  Boston:  Harvard Business School Press.

Friedman: Families Matter

Also see:

Nouwen: Make Space for Self, Others, and God 

Vanhoozer: How Do We Understand the Bible? Part 1 

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

 

 

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Spirituality: Monday Monologues (podcast) November 16, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on the Christian Spirituality. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Spirituality: Monday Monologues (podcast) November 16, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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