O’Donovan Splits Ethics into Faith and Action

ODonovan_review_20191022Oliver O’Donovan. 2001. Resurrection and Moral Order: An Outline for Evangelical Ethics. Leicester, England: Apollos.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

When I prepared to defend my doctoral dissertation, I got it all wrong. I practiced the detailed mathematical proofs, thinking that I would be tested on the depth of my understanding of economics. My committee examined me the economic fundamentals. Throughout my career since then, I have come to understand the wisdom of returning to the basics. Ethics works the same way.

In the prologue to Resurrection and Moral Order: An Outline for Evangelical Ethics, Oliver O’Donovan outlines his book with several important definitions:

“The principal orientations of the book are sketched out in the first part. Purposeful action is determined by what is true about the world into which we act; this can be called the ‘realist’ principal. That truth is constituted by what God has done for his world and mankind in Jesus Christ; this is the ‘evangelical’ principle. The act of God which liberates our action is focused on the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, which restored and fulfilled the intelligible order of creation; this we can call the ‘Easter’ principal. Each of these contentions has been challenged, or in some way qualified, in the recent literature in Christian ethics. They offer us, a grid on which to register some of the most important alternatives to the account of Christian ethics which this book advocates.” (ix)

Much of his book is devoted to explaining more fully what these definitions mean and imply with special emphasis on one fundamental truth: “Christian ethics must arise from the gospel of Jesus Christ.” (11)

Origin and Organization

Oliver O’Donovan (1945-) is an Anglican priest and scholar focused on Christian ethics educated at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.[1] He writes in twelve chapters divided into three parts:

  1. The gospel and Christian ethics

Part One: The objective reality

  1. Created order
  2. Eschatology and history
  3. Knowledge in Christ

Part Two: The subjective reality

  1. Freedom and reality
  2. Authority
  3. The authority of Christ
  4. The freedom of the church and the believer

Part Three: The form of the moral life

  1. The moral field
  2. The moral subject
  3. The double aspect of the moral life
  4. The end of the moral life (v)

These chapter is preceded by a preface and prologue, and followed by a bibliography and indices.

Two-Level Ethics

Although O’Donovan reviews creation ethics (natural law) at great length in part one on objective reality, he does not stop there. Redemptive history—creation, fall, and redemption—reduces to the dualist notion of “’from’ and ‘towards’, in which all the traditional language of good and evil is reinterpreted.” (63)

This two level of moral evaluation is not a novelty. O’Donovan writes: “There are conceived to be two levels at which moral thought proceeds: a fundamental level of intention—the will, in Kant—which makes a simple moral decision in favour of duty and the universal moral law, and a secondary level of empirical discernment which, as it were, merely administers that decision concretely.”(262)

O’Donovan articulates a similar two-level moral framework in Christian ethics. He writes:

“The ultimate and simple decision is not found in the books of human deeds, but in the book of life, where it is a question of Yes or No: either a name is there, or it is not.” (264)

In other words, the most important ethical decision is the intention to follow Jesus Christ. After that comes all other ethical decisions.

Assessment

Oliver O’Donovan’s Resurrection and Moral Order: An Outline for Evangelical Ethics provides a deep dive into Christian ethics beginning with a thorough review of creation ethics. This is a fascinating read for seminary students and pastors. I learned a lot. Perhaps, you will too.

Footnotes

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_O%27Donovan

O’Donovan Splits Ethics into Faith and Actio

Also See:

Bonhoeffer Introduces Christian Ethics, Part 1 

Top 10 Book Reviews Over the Past 12 Months

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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A Worshiping Community: Monday Monologues, November 11, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on A Worshiping Community.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

A Worshiping Community: Monday Monologues, November 11, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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A Worship Prayer

Nativity
Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Almighty God,

All majesty and power are yours for you touch our hearts and calm our nerves, refreshing life as none other.

Forgive our  sleepy eyes and irreverent attitudes, draw us closer to you with wonder and beauty and awe.

Thank you for blotting out the passions of the week. Lay bare our souls that we might be healed; excise wandering spirits that might never again be tormented.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, teach us to sing a new song, one of power and grace, that our joy may be complete and we more fully reflect your image to those around us.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

A Worship Prayer

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Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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A Worshiping Community

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Living in ChristObserve the Sabbath day, 

to keep it holy, 

as the LORD your God commanded you. 

(Deut 5:12)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

The divine origin of the Sabbath is well-attested in both the Old and New Testaments. In the Old Testament, it is the only commandment that appears also in the creation account and it is also the longest commandment—an indicator of emphasis. In the New Testament, Jesus refers to himself as the Lord of the Sabbath (Matt 12:8; Luke 6:5) and performs several miracles specifically on the Sabbath. Why all this attention to the Sabbath?

A Biblical Understanding

A key to understanding Sabbath is found in Hebrews 4, which list four aspects of Sabbath rest: physical rest, weekly Sabbath rest, rest in the Promised Land, and heavenly rest—our return to the Garden of Eden.

Physical rest is underrated by many Christians. Jesus says: “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” (Matt 11:28) How are we to love God and love our neighbors when we are physically exhausted all the time? Sabbath rest allows us to build the physical, emotional, and spiritual capacity to experience God and to have compassion for our neighbors.

We see a clue to this interpretation of Sabbath when we compare the Exodus and Deuteronomy renderings of the Fourth Commandment. Deuteronomy adds the sentence: 

“You shall remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the LORD your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm.” (Deut 5:15)

Free people rest; slaves work. Sabbath rest is a symbol of our Christian freedom.

The Promised Land, promised rest (Ps 95:11), heaven, and the new Eden (Rev 22:2) all display and reinforce Sabbath imagery. The image of our Divine Shepherd is one who gives heavenly rest: “He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters.” (Ps 23:2) Sadly, this poetic image of rest only seems to come up at funerals.

The 24-7 Culture

Postmodern culture refuses to rest. Sunday is fast becoming just another day where the malls are open and employers seldom offer overtime to those required to work it. So why does Moses insist on honoring the Sabbath?

Under penalty of death (Num 15:32-35), the prohibition on work on the Sabbath provided a cultural alternative to Pharaoh’s relentless pursuit of wealth. Brueggemann (2014, xiii-xiv) writes: YHWH governs as an alternative to Pharaoh, there the restfulness of YHWH effectively counters the restless anxiety of Pharaoh. Sabbath rest appears in the creation accounts because God balances work and rest. Egyptian gods, by contrast, never rested.

By honoring the Sabbath, Moses created room for the Hebrew people to reflect on their lives and on God, the gateway to keeping all the other commandments.

Sacrificial Worship

The link between rest and worship goes beyond occurring primarily on Sundays. Marva Dawn (1991, 1) observes: “To worship the Lord is—in the world’s eyes—a waste of time…the entire reason for our worship is that God deserves it.” To see this link, consider the ancient practice of offering burnt animal offerings in the temple rather than human sacrifices. Listen to the words of Aaron during the Golden Calf incident:

“And he received the gold from their hand and fashioned it with a graving tool and made a golden calf. And they said, These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!” (Exod 32:4)

No doubt Aaron was simply practicing worship in a manner that he had learned in Egypt—worshiping a Golden Calf (think of the Wall Street Bull) could be thought of as an ancient form of the prosperity Gospel! 

Sacrificing a bull (or some other animal) on the alter could therefore be another way for a Jew to demonstrate his allegiance to God, not to foreign gods. Because many of these foreign gods were crafted in the form of animals, sacrificing those same animals on an altar would be a gutsy, in-your-face type of activity for a Jew.

For us today, devoting our Sundays to worshipping God is to pledge our lives to him alone and not to the god of 24-7. In the same way, donating money to the church’s work is to worship God, not the god of money. Jesus speaks plainly on this subject:

“No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.” (Matt 6:24 KJV)⁠1

Because time and money are the reigning deities in our culture, offering God our time and money is our sincerest worship.

Footnotes

1 The King James Version transliterates the Greek (μαμωνᾷ), while other translations simple say money loosing the inference of deity more accurately that honors the text.

References

Brueggemann, Walter. 2014. Sabbath as Resistance: Saying NO to the Culture of Now. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Dawn, Marva J. 1999. A Royal “Waste” of Time: The Splendor fo Worshipping God and Being Church for the World. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans.

A Worshipping Community

Also See:

Value Of Life

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Dawn Widens Worship

Dawn_review_20191003Marva J. Dawn.[1] 1999. “A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time: The Splendor of Worshipping God and Being Church for the World. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

One of the great disappointments in seminary arose when I took my only worship class and the professor insisted on studying the worship requirements outlined in the Book of Order (the denomination governance manual). It was like taking a class in oil painting only to be given a canvas outlined in a paint-by-numbers schema. Nothing quenches the spirit (1 Thes 5:19) quicker than a programmatic church.

Introduction

In her book, A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time, Marva Dawn writes:

“Surely one of the greatest problems of our times is that we have become so nonchalant about the Lord of the cosmos. Certainly, if we were more immersed in God’s splendor we would find ourselves thoroughly lost in wonder, love, and praise.” (7)

In theological terms, we have lost our sense of God’s transcendence and prefer a “buddy god” that we can hang with on Sunday morning and forget about the rest of the week—my paraphrase. Dawn goes on to say:

“My primary concern in various churches’ and denominations’ struggles over worship is that so many decisions are being based on criteria other than the most essential—namely that God be the Subject and Object, the Infinite Center, of our worship.” (8)

Having lost its center, Dawn observes:

“Church has been turned into a place, a building, a duty, an hour on Sunday mornings, rather than what we are as ‘those called out’ (ekklesia) by Christ into a way of being in the world to the glory of God for the sake of others.” (9)

When the church’s center is God, the musical forms, the liturgy, and the mode of dress simply recede in importance.

Background and Organization

Marva Dawn received her doctorate in Christian ethics at University of Notre Dame. At the time she wrote this book, she was a seminary professor and the author of numerous books. She has since retired. Dawn writes in six parts:

  1. For the World: Culture
  2. Worshiping God: The Splendor of Our Infinite Center
  3. Being Church: Building Community
  4. Being Church: Forming Character
  5. Being Church: Choices
  6. For the World: Challenges (vii-viii)

Each part begins with a sermon, accept for the introduction where the theme sermon follows the introduction. This sermonic focus loosens the integration of the book, giving it an eclectic form and feel.

Wasting Time

Dawn’s thematic sermon takes Colossians 3:12-17 as its text. A key phrase in this reading is: And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts” (Col 3:15 ESV). Dawn applies this text seriously when she reminds us:

“And it [worship] is a royal waste of time because we have to die to ourselves and our egos, our purposes and accomplishments to live now in God’s kingdom.” (14)

For Dawn, wasting time in worship is, in other words, sacrificial, our way of participating in Christ’s crucifixion. This is much like the Apostle Peter’s observation: He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed.” (1 Pet 2:24 ESV)

In my own view, I see worship as a way of participating in the divine rest in creation. We are where God intends us to be, something often hard to achieve in this life.

Assessment

Marva J. Dawn’s A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time left a lasting impression on me in seminary as I came to see worship differently. In worship, we come to praise and adore God that we might become acquainted with the image we were created to reflect. True worship is more than the musical selections and their performance. Seminary students and pastors are best positioned to understand her detailed examination of contemporary worship controversies.

Footnotes

[1] http://MarvaDawn.org/about_Marva

Dawn Widens Worshi

Also See:

Bonhoeffer Introduces Christian Ethics, Part 1 

Top 10 Book Reviews Over the Past 12 Months

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Misplaced Affections: Monday Monologues, November 4, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Misplaced Affections.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Misplaced Affections: Monday Monologues, November 4, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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Prayer from the Heart

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Twins
Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Merciful father, beloved son, spirit of truth,

In sending your son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross we learned of your mercy and love. For this and for creating us, we give you all honor and praise.

Forgive us, Lord, for being so timid in practicing your sacrificial love and for letting our eyes wander from here to there.

Thank you, Lord, for being available, for modeling true love, and for drawing us to yourself in spite of our rebellion and tainted affections.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, restore us to the divine image that you gave us in Jesus of Nazareth. Leave us not to the folly of our heart’s desires, but teach us to number our years aright.

In Jesus’ precious name, Amen.

Prayer from the Heart

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Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Misplaced Affections

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Living in ChristBy Stephen W. Hiemstra

The radio silence today on discussions of morality is killing people.

In my annual physical this year, my doctor indicated that Baby Boomers are now considered at risk for hepatitis C and require routine screening. The key justification for this recommendation was:

“There is increasing HCV [hepatitis C virus]-associated morbidity and mortality, as annual HCV-associated mortality in the US increased more than 50% from 1999 to 2007 [currently 3.5 million cases]. People born 1945-1965 with hepatitis C face increasing hepatitis C-associated morbidity and mortality.” (CDC 2019b)

What stuns the heart is how hepatitis is usually contracted. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports:

“Although transmission via injection drug use remains the most common mode of HCV acquisition in the United States, sexual transmission is an important mode of acquisition among HIV-infected MSM [men having sex with men] with risk factors, including those who participate in unprotected anal intercourse, use sex toys, and use non-injection drugs.” (CDC 2019a)

While one might contract hepatitis in a third-world country through exposure to unprotected water, in the United States one generally needs to engage in high-risk behavior to contract the disease. In this context, thoughtful teaching about the morality of avoiding high-risk behavior can save lives and reduce much suffering.

Public Health Crises

High-risk behavior has become a public health hazard in the United States . Given our recent experience with Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), this conclusion should come as no surprise.

Roughly 675,000 people have died in the United States from AIDS according to the CDC (2016).  In addition, there were 1.1 million people in the United States infected with AIDS in 2015. Two-thirds of them were gay men. Most of the rest have been intravenous drug users, although spouses of victims can also contract the disease. The average lifetime treatment cost in 2010 dollars was: $379,668, which implies a drug market of roughly half a trillion dollars, one of the nation’s largest (CDC 2017, 2018a).

On top of HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)  infection, the number of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs—chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and chancroid) have growing rapidly over the past decade, especially among millennials and the elderly. A thirty-one percent increase between 2012 and 2017 (2.3 million cases) reported STDs cases reversed a downward decline in reported cases that began in the 1940s (CDC. 2018b). Today’s sexual liberality bears much of the blame for these outcomes.

Taking Stock

You may be thinking, why do I care? Isn’t using a condom sufficient caution and isn’t there a pill for every one of these diseases? The answer today is a qualified yes. Yes—if you are diagnosed early, then these diseases are treatable and there may even soon be a cure for AIDS.

The trouble is that not everyone has a health plan and gets a prompt diagnosis—sex has an addictive quality that often leads to taking more risks. More troubling is the observation that diseases often mutate into new, more viral strains—twenty years ago no one had heard of HCV and before 1980 no one had heard of HIV.

For those that want to limit this conversation to the realm of personal freedom and conversations with their doctors, the opioid crisis raises the specter of conflicting incentives in the health care system.⁠1 Treating AIDS is expensive and it may also be more profitable than treating other illnesses. What happens if drug companies and other health care providers become complicit in promoting alternative lifestyles motivated by their economic interest rather than concern for those afflicted?⁠2

Who exactly can you trust when a lot of money is changing hands?

Toward a Christian Perspective

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Before any conversation about moral behavior, know that God loves you because he created you and sent his son, Jesus Christ, to die for you. God’s love is extended unconditionally, irrespective of your health care status. But God’s love is a gift that must be accepted. The consequences of rejecting God’s love (or holding it lightly) can be severe.

The teaching of the church on the question of human sexuality has been clear since biblical times (Fortson and Grams 2016). Sex is reserved for married couples in a lifelong relationship between one man and one woman. All other sexual activity is sin, something that Christians are advised to avoid (Gagnon 2001).

The focus of a disciplined life is ideally on God. Extramarital sex leads to other priorities and denigrates the image of God that we should normally look for in other people.⁠3 One pastor I know makes the point that he always knows when kids start having sex because they soon drop out of church.

Doing Better

Knowing that the health care consequences of sexual immorality in this world can be severe, the critical question for those wavering on their response: if by your words you lead someone else into risky behavior, are you okay with the pain and other consequences? Are you okay, for example, with the problem that rising health care costs mean that more young mothers cannot afford care for their kids?

One of the most tortured women that I ever met was an HIV-positive prostitute who lost custody of her kids back in 2011. At one point she considered herself a consenting adult. Now, her kids have lost their mother. We cannot anticipate all the consequences of our decisions—the best we can do is to rely on God’s help to make better decisions.

If it is too late to worry about the above question, remember that we worship a God of second chances. Turn to him and find forgiveness, remembering Jesus’ words to the woman caught in adultery.⁠4

References

Campbell, W. P. 2010. Turning Controversy into Church Ministry: A Christlike Response to Homosexuality. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. (review)

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 2016. “Today’s HIV/AIDS Epidemic.” CDC Factsheet. Online:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/docs/factsheets/todaysepidemic-508.pdf. Accessed: 8 January 2019.

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 2017. HIV Cost-effectiveness. Online: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/programresources/guidance/costeffectiveness/index.html. Accessed: 8 January 2019.

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 2018a. Basic Statistics [on AIDS]. Online: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/statistics.html. Accessed: 8 January 2019.

Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ). 2015. Behavioral health trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (Health and Human Services (HHS) Publication No. SMA 15-4927, NSDUH Series H-50). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data. (Cited: 18 October 2018).

Center for Disease Control (CDC). 2018b. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2017. Online: https://www.cdc.gov/std/stats17/2017-STD-Surveillance-Report_CDC-clearance-9.10.18.pdf. Cited: 24 September 2019.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2019a. Epidemiology and Prevention of HIV and Viral Hepatitis Co-infections. Online: https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/populations/hiv.htm. Cited: 24 September 2019.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2019b. CDC Recommendation: Adults Born from 1945-1965 (Baby Boomers) get Tested for Hepatitis C. Online: https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/populations/1945-1965.htm. Cited: 24 September 2019.

Fortson, S. Donald and Rollin G. Grams. 2016. Unchanging Witness: The Consistent Christian Teaching on Homosexuality in Scripture and Tradition. Nashville: B&H Academic.(review)

Gagnon, Robert A. J. 2001. The Bible and Homosexual Practice: Texts and Hermeneutics. Nashville: Abingdon Press. (review)

Pope Paul VI. 2014. On Human Life (Humanae Vitae). San Francisco: Ignatius Press. (review)

Washington Post (WP) 2019. “Follow The Post’s investigation of the opioid epidemic.” Online: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/2019/07/20/opioid-files/?arc404=true. Cited: 24 September 2019.

Wener-Fligner, Zach. 2015. “Every US company arguing for the Supreme Court to legalize same-sex marriage.” March 10. Online: https://qz.com/359424/every-us-company-arguing-for-the-supreme-court-to-legalize-same-sex-marriage. Cited 24 September 2019.

Footnotes

1 More than 200,000 Americans have died from opioid overdoses. Many of these addictions began with prescription painkillers known to be addictive and very profitable for the companies producing them.. (e.g. WP 2019)

2 Among the 379 companies filling an amicus brief before the Supreme Court on Obergefell v. Hodges were some of the largest drug companies in the United States. (Wener-Fligner. 2015)

3 Mary Eberstadt cites four prophecies made in the Pope encyclical that appear to have taken place: “a general lowering of moral standards throughout society; a rise in infidelity; a lessening of respect for women by men; and the coercive use of reproductive technologies by governments.” (Pope Paul VI 2014, 11)

4 See John 8. A good book on ministering to homosexuals has been written by Campbell (2010)

 

Misplaced Affections

Also See:

Value Of Life

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Boyle Brings Homies Home

Boyle_review_20190905Gregory Boyle. 2011. Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. New York: Free Press.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

The subject of teenage street gangs—weaponized teenagers—is dear to my heart because I came to Christ at the age of 13 in response to the testimony of a Puerto Rican gang member, Nicki Cruz, in New York City. When I went to a showing of The Cross and the Switchblade, even though my neighborhood did not have formalized gangs, violence was a daily part of life

Introduction

In Tattoos on the Heart, Gregory Boyle writes about his experiences working with gangs in Los Angeles and founding Homeboy Industries that offers jobs to kids seeking to leave the gang life. He writes:

“I celebrate Catholic services, on a rotating basis, in twenty-five detention institutions in Los Angeles County—juvenile halls, probation camps, jails, and state youth authority facilities. After Mass, in the gym or chapel or classroom, I hand out my card. The infomercial is always the same: Call me when you get out. I’ll hook you up with a job—take off your tattoos—line ya up with a counselor. I won’t know where you are, but with this card, you’ll know where I am.” (187)

This book is about the kids that actually show up at his desk. He goes on:

“Clearly, the themes that bind the stories are things that matter to me. As a Jesuit for thirty-seven years and a priest for twenty-five years, it would not be possible for me to present these stories apart from God, Jesus, compassion, kinship, redemption, mercy, and our common call to delight in one another.” (xii-xiii)

While this book is not a memoir or chronology, it is accurate to describe it as narrative nonfiction.

Homeboy Industries

Homeboy Industries started in 1992 with the opening of a bakery that only employed former gang members (7). Boyle writes:

“Members from more than eight hundred gangs from all over the county now came seeking employment, tattoo removal, mental health counseling, and legal services…Homeboy Industries is not for those who need help, only for those who want it. In this sense, we are gang-rehabilitation center.” (8)

Seven years later, the bakery burned to the ground, apparently because of an electrical short (10-11). Because of their obvious success, they rebuilt and expanded.

Organization

Boyle writes in nine chapters preceded by a preface and introduction and followed by acknowledgments:

  1. God, I Guess
  2. Dis-Grace
  3. Compassion
  4. Water, Oil, Flame
  5. Slow Work
  6. Jurisdiction
  7. Gladness
  8. Success Kinship (vii)

We learn a few things about Boyle along the way, like he has a master’s in English, grew up in California, was the youngest priest in his dioceses, and began his ministry in Bolivia, but for the most part he tells stories about gang members that advance the themes that his writes about.

God’s Attributes

Boyle tells the story of his spiritual advisor whose father is dying of cancer. He would read to his father, hoping that we would fall asleep, but his father would just pretend to sleep while watching his son read. He writes:

“Bill knew that this evening ritual was really a story of a father who just couldn’t take his eyes off his kid. How much more so God?” (20)

Later he introduces us to Willy, who loves to brag but is a marginal gang member that does not really get into his “exploits” and who has serious problem with charming people out of their money. So Boyle drives him to the ATM and leaves him in the car, telling him to pray. When he gets back to the car with twenty bucks, Willy is noticeably quiet.

“You prayed, didn’t you?”

Without looking at him he responds: “Yes, I did.”

So what did God say to you?

“Well, first He said, Shut up and listen.” Then He said: “Heart full, eyes overflowing. “God … thinks … I’m … firme [Spanish].”

To the homies, firme means, “could not be one bit better.” (22-24) We all call God father, but Boyle gives a concise picture of what that looks like.

Assessment

Gregory Boyle’s Tattoos on the Heart that left me sorry when it ended. I just wanted to hear more. It personalized my image of a Hispanic gang member to the point that I could see their humanity, got angry at their poverty and isolation, and cheered their successes in finding a way out of the projects. I suspect that you will too.

Boyle Brings Homies Hom

Also See:

Value Of Life

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Sunshine and Exercise: Monday Monologues, October 28, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Sunshine and Exercise.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Sunshine and Exercise: Monday Monologues, October 28, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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