Carter Explores Strongholds

Carter_review_20191130Lisa Carter. 2016. The Stronghold. Nashville: Abingdon Press.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

What makes a book a Christian novel? Possibilities include:

  • A leading character is a “Christ figure” or a pastor whose life includes a sacrificial component.
  • God intervenes through circumstances to grow a character (or characters) to realize their potential and they turn to God in gratitude.
  • At least one minor character cites enough Bible verses to warrant their own scriptural index.
  • The hero must overcome a significant character flaw in vanquishing the villain, but relents from physically harming the villain. Instead, encourages the villain to overcome his/her own flaws.

In every case, happy endings rule the Christian novel. In my mind, the ideal Christian character grows to exhibit Christian virtues without speaking them out loud; yet, the context leaves no doubt as to who is ultimately responsible for the growth—subtly is virtue.

Overview

The title of Lisa Carter’s novel, The Stronghold, is a double-entendre. One is a tragic flaw; the other a long-forgotten fortress. An estranged couple—a tribal (Apache) police officer and an FBI (Chicano) agent—must work together to find and arrest a serial killer, and, as we learn later, to save their marriage. Much later in the story, we learn that they have strong Christian roots that they have not drawn attention to but live out in a rough and tumble part of Arizona along the Mexican border. Also noteworthy is the role of strong grandmother that brought them together, protected them, and prepared them for their Christian walk in spite of abuse and life-threatening adversity—a divine stronghold.

Lisa Carter

Lisa Carter describes herself as an author, teacher, speaker, quilter, musician, wife, and mother.[1] I met her at the Virginia chapter[2] of the American Christian Fiction Writer’s[3] annual conference in October 2019 where she served as a conference speaker.

Lisa’s talk interested me enough that I checked out her books in the conference bookstore. The Strongholdcaught my eye because I planned visit my son in Phoenix for Thanksgiving, because I volunteer in Hispanic ministry, and  because I was curious about the romantic suspense genre.[4]

Assessment

Lisa Carter’s The Stronghold is a classic page-turner that had me crying. The Stronghold offered me a good diversion over break during a five-hour flight, albeit not quite in a single sitting.

Footnotes

[1] http://www.LisaCarterAuthor.com.

[2] https://ACFWVirginia.com.

[3] https://www.ACFW.com.

[4] http://rwakod.org/Daphne. Romance Writers of America: Kiss of Death. The website for this award describes it as: The Daphne is a writing contest for published and unpublished authors of romantic suspense, mystery, suspense, and thrillers with romantic subplots and mainstream mystery, suspense, and thrillers.” The sponsors of this award have no religious affiliation.

Carter Explores Strongholds

Also see:

Fukuyama Understands Identity 

Vance Chronicles White Poverty in America

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Coverage and Healing: Monday Monologues, December 9, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Coverage and Healing.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Coverage and Healing: Monday Monologues, December 9, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Praying for Strength

Ten K
Lansing, Michigan, 1983

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Almighty and Merciful Father,

For the strength you give us, the healing you lavish on us, and the shelter you offer us from many storms, we give you glory and honor.

We confess that we are weak, sin-sick, and blind to many fiascos of our own making.

But we thank you for your healing presence day and night. We thank you for modeling strength in the midst of chaos and wisdom in the midst of all foolishness. In the power of your Holy Spirit, grant us strength for the day, grace for those we meet, and peace that our hearts would never be troubled.

In Jesus’s precious name, Amen.

Praying for Strength

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Covered and Healed

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Living in ChristFor we know, 

brothers and sisters loved by God, 

that he has chosen you, 

because our gospel came to you 

not only in word, but also in power and 

in the Holy Spirit and with full conviction. 

(1Thes 1:4-5)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Do you truly feel forgiven and loved by God?

It is one thing to know that you are covered by the blood of Jesus in your head and it is another thing to feel it in your heart. 

Fear and Anxiety

In 2010, I signed up for a small group discussion at church. A couple days later the pastor’s wife called to inform me that the group that I have signed up for was over-subscribed and asked whether I would be willing to join another group. No problem, I said reluctantly thinking to myself–why would I want to join a group talking about fear? So I bought the book and as I read along, I found my life jumping off the pages–not only had fear crept into my life; it was quietly dictating a lot of my decisions. Through almost no effort on my part, God had directed me to a major stronghold in my life and helped me deal with it.

Max Lucado (2009, 5-6) observed that: ordinary children today are more fearful than psychiatric patients were in the 1950s. Fear displaces happiness; fear is unproductive; fear is self-defeating. After the storm on the Galilee, Jesus asked: why were you afraid? (Matthew 8:26) In suggesting the destructive potential of fear, Martin Niemoeller observed in 1933 that it was fear that transformed Adolf Hitler into a tyrant (Lucado 2009, 9-11).

Fear of losing one’s children, one’s job, or one’s health can paralyze a person. Who can contemplate Einstein’s theory of relativity when one worries about the roof collapsing? We live in an age of fear. 

Emergency Room

I recently made a trip to Cambridge, MA to visit my daughter and her husband. We had a wonderful time together, but two days before my return home I ate something that set off my stomach and it exacerbated a problem that I have with my prostrate. Unable to urinate, I ended up in the local hospital in the emergency room where they inserted a catheter, which I lived with for about two weeks. Because movement of almost any kind was uncomfortable, I was able to travel home but almost all of my normal activities—writing, exercise, volunteering, church attendance—halted during my distress.

Embarrassed by my condition, I did not advertise my sudden dependency on the good graces of my friends and family. Nevertheless, word got around and I soon found three churches and a lot of friends praying over me. Meanwhile, my wife proved herself to be an absolute angel.

A great peace came over me. For the first time in recent memory, I found myself anxiety-free. I have always felt God’s love; now, I felt loved like never before by the church and my family. Being a lifelong nervous eater, this peace displaced interest in food and I lost more than ten pounds, a healing brought about by this peace.

Loved by God

We serve a God of abundance. The Apostle John recognized the divinity of Christ through his miracles of abundance: wine, loaves of bread, and fish (John 2, 6, 21). The trademark of God’s healing displays itself as healing extends beyond the presenting diagnosis. In my case, I no longer need a catheter and I continue to enjoy a deep peace and weight loss.

References

Lucado, Max. 2009. Fearless: Imagine Your Life Without Fear. Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

Covered and Healed

Also See:

Value Of Life

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Goldberg Chronicles Progressivism, Part 2

Goldberg_review_20191108Jonah Goldberg. 2009. Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Change. New York: Random House.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

One of the challenges being a social conservative today arises because both political parties drink the same progressive cool-aid. Mainstream politicians in both parties twist the U.S. Constitution to suit their needs, manipulate markets with tax policy, promote corporate interests, and endorse an imperial presidency. Individual freedom and democracy have given away to individualism defined as consumer choice and gender/minority rights.

With most politicians drinking the same cool-aid, the body politic lacks an effective opposition to keep elected officials honest and to offer voters real alternatives. Large corporations control most politicians and, through their media affiliates, they control most public discourseshutting down debate once their perspective is expressed (political correctness). For dedicated news watchers, this means that the national news now looks more like the local news written large—weather, accidents, and human-interest stories has replaced most reporting on political debates. When a book like Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism comes out explaining how this manipulation of the public works, it is both fascinating and hard to evaluate.

In part 1 of this review, I provide an overview of the Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism, while in part 2 I examine his arguments in more detail. While a number of topics could be discussed, let me focus on three: progressivism versus classical liberalism, the media, and demythologizing National Socialism.

Progressivism Versus Classical Liberalism

Classical liberalism focused on personal liberties and limiting the power of government. Jeffersonian democracy promoted small business, especially family farms, empowering voters, and limiting government. In the nineteenth century, the U.S. government opened up frontier lands by granting small tracts of land to settlers hoping to give them a stack in managing local communities and governments. Competition in markets (small business), politics (multiple parties), and religion (no state religion) was actively encouraged to limit the development of powerful groups and to maintain an informed electorate. Democracy cannot thrive when voters point to a business, party, or church and just say: me too.

Classical liberalism began to lose its influence after the Civil War because the war effort encouraged the development of large, urban-based corporations to supply federal troops. Wealthy owners entered politics and saw America falling behind Europe in the development of colonies. Large corporations soon controlled both markets and the political process and saw the need to extend their influence worldwide, especially as the old Spanish empire began to come unraveled in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia. The Spanish American war set the stage for the election of progressive politicians, such as Teddy Roosevelt. Intervention in foreign markets was soon followed by intervention in domestic markets.

The election of progressive Woodrow Wilson was a turning point in progressive thought because World War One offered him the opportunity to intervene even more deeply into domestic markets and to develop sophisticated propaganda organizations, such as the Committee on Public Information (109). Thanks to the writings of John Dewey, progressives began to focus on education as a tool for social engineering. Goldberg (88) cites Wilson, then president of Princeton University: “Our problem is not merely to help the student to adjust themselves to world life…[but] to make them as unlike their fathers as we can.”

The Lincoln Administration impressed Wilson because he saw war as a tool for implementing his social agenda (84). “War was the midwife of progress” from the progressive view (99). Classic liberalism died off because it did not aid the progressive desire to centralize power and limit debate.

Modern Media

Goldberg articulates the problem with the progressive media better than anyone that I have read. He writes:

“If big business is so right-wing, why do huge banks fund liberal and left-wing charities, activists, and advocacy groups, then brag about it in commercials and publicity campaigns? How [do you] explain that there’s virtually no major issue in the culture wars—from abortion to gay marriages to affirmative action—where big business has played a major role on the American right while there are dozens of examples of corporations supporting the liberal side?” (312)

The uneven playing field is not limited to corporate donations. Goldberg writes:

“These speech regulations in turn give an unfair advantage to some very big businesses—media conglomerates, movie studios, and such—to express their political views exempt from government regulation…[For example] The New York Times is pro-choice and supports pro-choice candidates—openly on its editorial pages, more subtly in its news pages. Pro-life groups need to pay to get their views across, but such paid advertising is heavily regulated, thanks to [republican] McCain, at exactly the moment it might influence people—that is, near Election Day. One can replace abortion with gun control, gay marriage, environmentalism, affirmative action, immigration, and other issues, and the dynamic is the same.” (313)

The same dynamic is working in public schools where Christianity is classified as a religion and Christian participation in the classrooms is severely limited. Meanwhile, other religions and causes are openly taught, especially on college campuses. The operative phrase is ABC (anything but Christian).

Demythologizing National Socialism

Because of the association of National Socialism (Nazism) with anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, it has been rightly demonized. As a consequence, it is hard for Americans to understand how much Nazi social policy looks like that of today’s progressives. In Germany today, Hitler is remembered for putting Germans back to work in the Great Depression, building the Autobahn, and promoting the design of the Volkswagen Beetle.

Americans are not anxious to hear that German National Socialists crafted their Jewish legislation after American sterilization (Indiana 1907) and other racially-motivated laws, such as the Davis-Bacon Act (1931; 263-266). Or that many prominent democrats, such as Senator Robert Byrd, were members of the Klu Klux Klan because after the recruiting film (1915), The Birth of a Nation, the Klan was considered a progressive institution, no more racist than Americans more generally (259). This is not the America that we like to remember, but these American ideas influenced National Socialism more than vice versa. The effect on Germany was more profound because the German constitution did not protect minorities as well as the U.S. Constitution and because Germany was more racially homogeneous (263).

What surprised me most about Nazi social policy, beyond the focus on eugenics and euthanasia, was their interest in vegetarianism, environmentalism, and health consciousness (385). The Nazis also promoted animal rights (387). The Nazis were the first to study the effects of smoking on health and actually campaigned against alcoholism. Goldberg cites the Hitler Youth health manual: “You have a duty to be healthy.” (389) The theme here is using social control to make you a better person, but you don’t necessarily get a vote in the matter.

Demythologizing National Socialism makes it obvious that Nazis were truly socialists. While they used draconian methods to implement their social policy, the same policies are being promoted today by progressive politicians using psychology and the media campaigns that most people are simply unaware of.

If you believe that this is not true, why are human resource departments today, especially in large corporations, using psychological testing to screen candidates, including pastors. Armed with a psychological profile of the ideal candidate, the pool of applicants limited before qualifications are even considered. While it is illegal to use racial profiling (negative profiling), positive profiling (filling a racial quota) is legal and emotional intelligence (a highly subjective term) is routinely used to exclude alpha males.

Assessment

Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism offers a conservative reading of the last century of progressive politics both in the U.S. and Europe written in journalistic style. The title of the book, Liberal Fascism, is a progressive self-description coined by H.G. Wells in 1932. The cover art depicting a mustached smiley face captures the tension between strong leadership focused on people’s perceived needs and traditional American skepticism of power unchecked by constitutional restraint.

Goldberg’s history of progressivism documents the genealogy of many of today’s most bitterly debated issues. Did you know that the term, culture war (kulturkampf), dates back to the Bismarck period (late nineteenth century) in Germany? I learned a great deal reading Goldberg. Perhaps, you will too

Goldberg Chronicles Progressivism, Part 2

Also see:

Fukuyama Understands Identity 

Vance Chronicles White Poverty in America

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Thanks_2019

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Closure: Monday Monologues, December 2, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Closure.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Closure: Monday Monologues, December 2, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer for Closure

Flowers_Georgetown_South_20190711By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Merciful father,

For marking the seasons of our lives in meaning and honor, we offer our praise and give you the glory.

We confess that we often treat life as one continuous and burdensome moment, like a sleepless night, when the passage of time has no meaning and our anxieties run wild.

Forgive us for refusing to rest and be joyful for the many gifts that you have given us, from life itself to simple things like enjoying a rainbow or a snowflake.

Still, we give thanks that you for the forgiveness that you offer in Jesus Christ, who lived a perfect life, died on the cross, and rose from the dead to set us free.

In the power of your Holy Spirit, show us how to mark the time aright, honoring its passage, and rejoicing with all creation that we are your sons and daughters.

In Jesus’ precious name, Amen

Prayer for Closure

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Thanks_2019

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Finding Closure

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Living in ChristJesus said to him, 

No one who puts his hand to the plow and 

looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.

(Luke 9:62)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

It’s not how you start, but how you finish that matters to God. Jesus makes this point when he finds himself alone, talking to the woman caught in adultery:

Jesus stood up and said to her, Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you? She said, No one, Lord. And Jesus said, Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more. (John 8:10-11)

We all have history. What we share in Jesus Christ is the opportunity to live into a future defined by who God says we are, not what our sins might define us to be. This is the essence of our freedom in Christ.

The Plow

When Jesus talks in Luke 9:62 cited above about putting ones hand to the plow, he is reminding his followers of the calling of Elisha by Elijah the prophet:

So he departed from there and found Elisha the son of Shaphat, who was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen in front of him, and he was with the twelfth. Elijah passed by him and cast his cloak upon him. And he left the oxen and ran after Elijah and said, Let me kiss my father and my mother, and then I will follow you. And he said to him, Go back again, for what have I done to you? And he returned from following him and took the yoke of oxen and sacrificed them and boiled their flesh with the yokes of the oxen and gave it to the people, and they ate. Then he arose and went after Elijah and assisted him. (1 Kgs 19:19-21)

Here in this story, no one questions the commitment of Elisha to follow Elijah, but Jesus’ ministry is coming to an end and he demands a higher level of commitment as he prepares his disciples for his own death.

Os Guinness recounts the story of one eighteen year-old Jane Lucretia D’Esterre, Guinness’ great-great-grandmother, who distraught over the death of her husband in 1815 in a duel, gave up the thought of suicide through drowning as she stood on a riverbank because she noticed the son of a neighbor plowing a field:

Meticulous, absorbed, skilled, he displayed such as pride in his work that the newly turned furrows looked as finely execute as the paint strokes on an artist’s canvas. (Guinness 2003, 184) 

Mind you, this young man plowed with a team of horses that have a mind of their own!

Guinness’ story not only reminds me of the story of Elisha’s calling, but also of the importance of attending to our daily work as service not only for our supervisors but for the Lord. Imagine what might have happened to the young woman if this young man had abandoned his efforts after only plowing half his field that day.

Finishing well

The need to complete what we start, to take risks to advance God’s kingdom, is highlighted in Jesus’ Parable of the Talents. In this parable Jesus describes a businessman who, in preparing for a trip, leaves his assets in the hands of trusted assistants, in amounts corresponding to their abilities. The first receiving, for example, a million dollars, another two million, and a third five million.

When he returned from his trip, he asked for an accounting from his assistants. The latter two assistants invested his money and doubled it, earning their bosses’ praise: well done, good and faithful servants. The businessman then promoted these assistants placing them in charge of entire divisions in his company.

By contrast, the first assistant stashed the boss’ money in a vault and simple returned what he had been given. Seeing no gain from his confidence in this first assistant, the businessman criticized him calling him lazy and gave his million to the assistant now holding ten. The businessman then fired this assistant and sent him on his way. (Matt 25: 14-30)

Celebrate the Season

In my own life, I have always sensed that life is short, too short to dawdle. I have learned, however, that rather than running from one task to another, we need to celebrate the seasons of life both by completing them and by marking their completion.

Remember the Exodus of the people of Israel from Egypt. Once they crossed the Red Sea and witnessed the salvation of God in the destruction of the Egyptian army, they danced and sang praises to God:

“I will sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea.” (Exod 15:1)

After then spending forty years in the desert, God parted the Jordan River and they crossed into the Promised Land. As they did, God instructed Joshua to mark the occasion:

And Joshua said to them, Pass on before the ark of the Lord your God into the midst of the Jordan, and take up each of you a stone upon his shoulder, according to the number of the tribes of the people of Israel, that this may be a sign among you. When your children ask in time to come, What do those stones mean to you? then you shall tell them that the waters of the Jordan were cut off before the ark of the covenant of the Lord. When it passed over the Jordan, the waters of the Jordan were cut off. So these stones shall be to the people of Israel a memorial forever.” (Josh 4:5-7)

These memory stones are sometimes called Ebenezers. Modern Ebenezers are things like birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, graduations, funerals, and simple things, like keeping a journal of answered prayers and other divine interventions in your life. 

When I have a bad day—get stuck in a moment—and need a good talking to, I often go back and read my own prayers and other writings. Being reminded of where I have been (God’s goodness in my life) and where I am going (our future in Christ) reminds me of whose I am and gives life meaning.

References

Guinness, Os. 2003. The Call: Finding and Fulfilling the Central Purpose of Your Life. Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

Finding Closure

Also See:

Value Of Life

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Thanks_2019

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Goldberg Chronicles Progressivism, Part 1

Goldberg_review_20191108Jonah Goldberg. 2009. Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Change. New York: Random House.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

One of the challenges of living and working in Washington DC is that you learn to read the political tea-leaves. When you are young, this prospect sounds intriguing and the temptation is to become a news-aholic. As one grows older, understanding politics leads to cynicism and a realization that when something is broken, it is not an accident—lack of information seldom explains bad policy. Ultimately, one begins to suspect that political awareness taints one’s soul—a form of original sin. Still, as voters and functional adults we have an obligation to be informed about the tradeoffs—politics is a necessary evil.

Introduction

In his book, Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left, From Mussolini to the Politics of Change Jonah Goldberg writes an historical account of the progressive movement in the United States. He compares and contrasts the progressive movement with fascism in Europe and communism in the former Soviet Union. He writes:

“Fascism is a religion of the state. It assumes the organic unity of the body politic and longs for a national leader attuned to the will of the people. It is totalitarian in that it views everything as political and holds that any action by the state is justified to achieve the common good. It takes responsibility for all aspects of life.”(23)

What makes this task of defining progressivism so slippery is that prior to the Second World War, progressives in the United States, such as Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, provided the template for fascists in Europe.

What changed with the war was that Hitler’s anti-Semitism made it difficult for Americans to see anything good in fascism, in spite of the made-in-USA origin of many of Hitler’s ideas (9).[1] Progressives (or liberals) then began describing anything bad (or anything unprogressive) as fascist, making it hard to define fascism with analytical clarity. The book’s title, Liberal Fascism, was coined by H.G. Wells, a noted progressive, in 1932 (21).

The Third Way

Defining progressivism is understandably difficult because it evolved from the Social Gospel movement and the application of the scientific method to social science in the nineteenth century. The Social Gospel movement of the early nineteenth century strove to prepare the world for the coming of Christ (premillennialism) with campaigns for equal rights for women, abolition of slavery, and abstinence from alcohol. The scientific revolution inspired a pragmatic attitude in social policy focused on results and experimentation, not ideology. Progressive leaders therefore eschewed leftist or rightest policies to craft a third way, which was decidedly non-ideological, and led by experts.

This third-way mantra unified American progressives—Wilson, The Roosevelts, Kennedy, Clinton, and Obama—with European fascists (Mussolini and Hitler) and communists (Lenin and Stalin). This non-ideological stance has proven intensely popular over time and has had a lasting impact on American policies, such as the New Deal and the Great Society. The dark side of this experimentation in public policy arises, not from unpopular ideas being imposed by “crazed” leaders, but by the prejudices that societies insist on acting on from time to time.

Background and Organization

Jonah Goldberg (1969+) is a conservative columnist, born and raised Jewish in Manhattan, New York. He attended Goucher College in Towson, Maryland.[2] He writes in ten chapters:

  1. Mussolini: The Father of Fascism
  2. Adolf Hitler: Man of the Left
  3. Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of Liberal Fascism
  4. Franklin Roosevelt’s Fascist New Deal
  5. The 1960s: Fascism Takes to the Streets
  6. From Kennedy’s Myth to Johnson’s Dream: Liberal Fascism and the Cult of the State
  7. Liberal Racism: The Eugenic Ghost in the Fascist Machine
  8. Liberal Fascist Economics
  9. Brave New Village: Hillary Clinton and the Meaning of Liberal Fascism
  10. The New Age: We’re All Fascists Now

These chapters follow an introduction and are followed by two “afterwords”, acknowledgments, appendices, notes, and an index.

Assessment

In part 1 of this review, I provide an overview of the Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism, while in part 2 I examine his argument in more detail.

Jonah Goldberg’s Liberal Fascism offers a conservative reading of the last century of progressive politics both in the U.S. and Europe written in journalistic style. The title of the book, Liberal Fascism, is a progressive self-description coined by H.G. Wells in 1932. The cover art depicting a mustached smiley face captures the tension between strong leadership focused on people’s perceived needs and traditional American skepticism of power unchecked by constitutional restraint.

Goldberg’s history of progressivism documents the genealogy of many of today’s most bitterly debated issues. Did you know that the term, culture war (kulturkampf), dates back to the Bismarck period (late nineteenth century) in Germany? I learned a great deal reading Goldberg. Perhaps, you will too.

Footnotes

[1] The revulsion of U.S. progressives with Hitler’s anti-Semitism could be seen as conveniently hypocritical because German National Socialists crafted their Jewish legislation after American sterilization (Indiana 1907) and other racially-motivated laws, such as the Davis-Bacon Act (1931; 263-266).

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonah_Goldberg.

Goldberg Chronicles Progressivis

Also see:

Fukuyama Understands Identity 

Vance Chronicles White Poverty in America

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Thanks_2019

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Anger and Murder: Monday Monologues, November 25, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Anger and Murder.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Anger and Murder: Monday Monologues, November 25, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Thanks_2019

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