Hollinger Sees Faith as Holistic

Hollinger_review__20200203Dennis P. Hollinger.[1] 2005. Head, Heart, and Hands: Bringing Together Christian Thought, Passion, and Action. Downers Grove: IVP Books.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

My latest writing project, Living in Christ, focuses on ethics, which focuses on what do in response to our faith. This project could be seen as my life’s finally being written down, but in fact today’s church finds ethics unusually hard to cope with. Some church specialize in great worship with great musicians making a regular appearance; others are way out there on social action being involved in every demonstration at the local seat of government; still others have are deep into theology and invite notable speakers are on a regular basis. Relatively few churches have a lot of young people in attendance or conduct a lot of baptisms, suggesting that the division of labor among the churches is not aiding the evangelistic mission of the church (Matthew 28) and may actually be a hinderance.

Introduction

 In his book, Head, Heart, and Hands, Dennis Hollinger observes:

“Taken alone, thought, passion, and action render a fragmented faith that only further engenders a fragmented self and a fragmented church.” (16)

“The problem is that most believers and Christian organizations or movements have accentuated one dimension to the neglect of the others.” (9)

A fragmented self lacks direction; a fragmented church cannot reflect the image of God in a society wounded by record suicides, drug overdoses, and declining fertility rates and life expectancy.

Holistic Faith in Tension with the Times

The idea that Christian faith is a holistic faith that can transcend the circumstances of society seems today to be a remote possibility in a society conditioned to believe that anything can be achieved through a proper division of labor. In the modern period, economists have taught that dividing up a problem and allocated the different parts to specialists (professions) is the most efficient way to organize research, administration, production, and distribution. Thus, any enterprise that requires a holistic approach—as Hollnger sees faith—runs contrary to the spirit of the times. Is it any wonder that megachurch pastors, thinking like good CEOs, have no trouble with online, radio,/ and television ministries, but routinely have trouble with engendering discipleship?

Interestingly, the same problem afflicted the protestant churches after the Reformation as the balance between theology, spirituality, and action promoted by the reformers melted away in contests over doctrinal purity among the different denominations that evolved in later years (19). The megachurches today share much in common with the cathedrals established before the modern period.

Background and Organization

Hollinger is a past-president of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary where he also taught ethics. He graduated from Elizabethtown College, received a Master’s of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and a doctorate from Drew University. He did post-doctoral work at Oxford University.[2]

Hollinger writes in ten chapters:

  1. Fragmented Faith and Fragmented People
  2. Christian Faith and the Head
  3. Distortions of the Head
  4. Christian Faith and the Heart
  5. Distortions of the Heart
  6. Christian Faith and the Hands
  7. Distortions of the Hands
  8. Head, Heart, and Hands Together: The Biblical Case
  9. Head, Heart, and Hands Together: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
  10. Head, Heart, and Hands Together: Implications and Challenges (xii)

These chapters are preceded by a preface and followed by notes.

The Biblical Case for Holistic Faith

Hollinger spills a lot of ink documenting weaknesses in the faith caused by fragmentary theology, spirituality, and practice, as he should. What is interesting to me, however, is how the Bible does not make these same errors in neither the Old or New Testaments. This struggle with fragmentation is nothing new. Consider the first passage that Hollinger cites—the Shema:

“Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.” (Deut 6:4-5 ESV)

Nothing here is left out—heart, mind, and hands—as Hollinger notes (145-146). The most basic prayer in Judaism is holistic and is underscored by Christ himself (Matt 22:37) Combining this holistic passage with neighbor love, as Jesus does, does not subtract from its holistic nature. Hollinger cites a half dozen other passages from the Old and New Testaments, but one other stands out: Romans 1:20-32. He writes:

“If ever there was a passage that brings head, heart, and hands together, this is it. It is somewhat typical to read this text as a chronological movement from false thinking, to wayward heart, to debased moral actions.”(151)

Hollinger sees the ordering as less important than the realization that head, heart, and hands are inter-related and affect one another. In other words, when we sin (hands), we often turn around to justify what we have done (head) and start to believe that our sin is also actually good (heart). How many parents, politicians, and pastors have not opposed homosexuality only to change their views after a child or other close relative has announced that they were gay. This is an obvious example of the interaction between head, heart, and hands in practice.

Assessment

Dennis Hollinger’s Head, Heart, and Hands focuses on the need for the church to engender a holistic faith by linking good theology and heart filled worship with practical acts of service. Hollinger effectively argues this point biblically with supporting arguments from other academic fields, such as education and psychology. This is a very practical, deeply theological text of interest to pastors, lay people, and theologians written in an accessible style.

Footnotes

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Hollinger. [2] https://www.gordonconwell.edu/faculty/senior/dennis-hollinger

Hollinger Sees Faith as Holistic

Also see:

Elliott: God’s Emotions Inform Our Emotions, Part 1

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Poor in Spirit: Monday Monologues, Podcast on February 17, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on the Poor in Spirit.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Poor in Spirit: Monday Monologues, Podcast on February 17, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer for the Poor in Spirit

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Oh dear Lord,

I give thanks that you are ever near to me—not too proud to linger with your servant and call me friend.

Bless me with your spirit of humility and generosity—generous in time, generous in friendship, and generous in sharing yourself.

Keep me safe from bad company; keep me safe from pious arrogance; keep me safe from my own sinful heart.

Let me always be ever near to you, now and always, through the power of your Holy Spirit.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer for the Poor in Spirit

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

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Oración por los Pobres en Espíritu

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Oh querido Señor,

Doy gracias porque siempre estás cerca de mí, no demasiado orgulloso para quedarte  con tu sirviente y llamarme amigo.

Bendíceme con tu espíritu de humildad y generosidad—generoso en tiempo, generoso en amistad, y generoso en compartir ti mismo.

Guárdame seguro de la mala compañía; guárdame seguro de la arrogancia piadosa; guárdame seguro de mi propria pecaminoso corazón.

Permíteme estar siempre cerca de tí, ahora y siempre, a través del poder de tu Espíritu Santo.

En el nombre de Jesús, Amén.

Oración por los Pobres en Espírit

Ver también:

Oración del Creyente

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Honored are the Poor in Spirit

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101Honored are the poor in spirit, 

for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 

(Matt 5:3)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Jesus chose words carefully. If he spoke Hebrew (the language of the Old Testament) rather than Greek (the language of the first century church), then the First Beatitude could be stated in only seven (Matt 5:3 HNT) which aided memorization, a common first century practice because of the high cost of the written word. Because the disciples memorized his words, Jesus could speak playing word games with them, starting sentences and letting them finish them, much like a good preacher will pause to let his audience catch up (Crawford and Troeger 1995, 17).

Interpreting the Beatitudes

 Jesus also used this technique—common in repressive cultures—in disputing with the Pharisees, as in Matthew 21:16 where he cites the first half Psalm 8:2 and, by inference, slams them with the second half (Spangler and Tverberg 2009, 38). Jesus’ careful choice of words and use of word associations helps us interpret the Beatitudes. For example, the first word in the phrase in Matthew 5:3—“Honored are the poor in spirit”—brings to mind the first Psalm:

Honored is the man who walks not in the counsel of the wicked, nor stands in the way of sinners, nor sits in the seat of scoffers; but his delight is in the law of the LORD, and on his law he meditates day and night. (Ps 1:1–2)

The phrase, poor in spirit, brings to mind Isaiah 61:

The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me, because the LORD has anointed me to bring good news to the poor; he has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to those who are bound; to proclaim the year of the LORD’s favor, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all who mourn; to grant to those who mourn in Zion—to give them a beautiful headdress instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, the garment of praise instead of a faint spirit; that they may be called oaks of righteousness, the planting of the LORD, that he may be glorified.” (Isa 61:1–3)

The first text, Psalm 1, plainly references the Law of Moses and the second text, Isaiah 61, references a messianic prophecy that Jesus himself cites in his call sermon in Luke 4. Together, by using the word—μακάριος, Jesus associates with both the Law and the Prophets which for a first century Jewish audience added gravitas.

Poor?

Today’s commentators normally highlight the expression, “poor in spirit” (οἱ πτωχοὶ τῷ πνεύματι), that is not used elsewhere in the Bible. Luke’s version of the Beatitude refers only to poor (πτωχοὶ), as in: “honored are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God.” (Luke 6:20) Poor here refers not just to low income, but to begging destitution—someone utterly dependent on God (Neyrey 1998, 170–171). Matthew, unlike Luke, was one of Jesus’ disciples, which makes it likely that his phrase, poor in spirit, is more accurate.

Hyperbole?

Taken as a whole, the First Beatitude appears hyperbolic for two reasons. The first reason is that Jesus uses a form borrowed from case law, if X, then Y. Using a legal form suggests something like the reading of a will. Second, Jesus associates things not normally associated. Unlike princes, poor do not normally inherit kingdoms; kings (those with kingdoms) are not normally humble. Thus, the First Beatitude suggests by its form and content that Jesus is using hyperbole to warm up his audience for what is obviously a serious  discussion (Isa 42:1–3).

Kingdom of Heaven

The seriousness arises because the phrase, “kingdom of heaven,” was previously associated with judgment, as in: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matt 3:2, 4:17). Judgment may be implied in the converse of this Beatitude—do those who refuse to be poor in spirit (the proud) stand in opposition to the “kingdom of heaven”? Potentially, yes. Two candidates for judgment are almost immediately given:

Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments [in the Law and the Prophets] and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:19–20)

Those least in the kingdom of heaven are those who teach against the law and those not to be admitted are those less righteous than the scribes and the Pharisees, according to Jesus’ own words (Matt 5:20).

Jesus chose words carefully.

References

Crawford, Evans E. and Thomas H. Troeger. 1995. The Hum: Call and Response in African American Preaching. Nashville: Abingdon Press.

Neyrey, Jerome H. 1998. Honor and Shame in the Gospel of Matthew. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Spangler, Ann and Lois Tverberg. 2009. Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: How the Jewishness of Jesus Can Transform Your Faith. Grand Rapids: Zondervan.

Honored are the Poor in Spirit

Also see:

Preface to a Life in Tension

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Honrado Son los Pobres en Espíritu

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Honrado son los pobres en espíritu, 

pues de ellos es el reino de los cielos. 

(Matt 5:3)

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Jesús elige palabras cuidadosamente. Si hablaba hebreo (la idioma del Antiguo Testamento) en lugar de griego (la idioma de la iglesia primitiva), entonces la primera Bienaventuranza podría explicarse en solo siete palabras (Matt 5:3 HNT), que facilita memorización, una practica comuna en el premer siglo debido de la alta costa de la palabra escrita. Debido a que los discípulos memorizaron su palabras, Jesús podría hablar jugando juegos de palabras con ellos, comenzando frases y dejándo que su audiencia los termine, al igual que un buen predicador se detendrá para dejar que su audiencia se ponga al día (Crawford y Troeger 1995, 17).

Interpretar las Bienaventuranzas

Jesús usó esta tecnica—común en las culturas represivas—también en disputar con los fariseos, como en Mateo 21:16 donde cita la primera mitad de Salmo 8:2 y, por inferencia, los golpea en la segunda mitad (Spangler y Tverberg 2009, 38). La selección cuidadosa de palabras de Jesus y su uso de asociaciones de palabras nos ayudan a interpretar las Bienaventuranzas.

Por ejemplo, la primera palabra en la frase en Mateo 5:3—“Honrado son los pobres en espíritu”—trae a mente al primero Salmo:

¡Cuán bienaventurado [honrado] es el hombre que no anda en el consejo de los impíos, Ni se detiene en el camino de los pecadores, Ni se sienta en la silla de los escarnecedores, sino que en la ley del SEÑOR está su deleite, Y en Su ley medita de día y de noche! (Ps 1:1-2)

La frase, los pobres en espíritu, trae a mente Isaías 61:

El Espíritu del Señor Dios está sobre mí, porque me ha ungido el Señor para traer buenas nuevas a los afligidos. Me ha enviado para vendar a los quebrantados de corazón, para proclamar libertad a los cautivos y liberación a los prisioneros; para proclamar el año favorable del Señor, y el día de venganza de nuestro Dios; para consolar a todos los que lloran, para conceder que a los que lloran esion se les dé diadema en vez de ceniza, aceite de alegría en vez de luto, manto de alabanza en vez de espíritu abatido; para que sean llamados robles de justicia, plantío del Señor, para que el sea glorificado. (Isa 61:1-3)

El primero texto, Salmo 1, claramente refiere a la Ley de Moises y el segundo texto, Isaías 61, refiere una profecía mesiánica que Jesús mismo citó en su llamado sermón de  en Lucas 4. Junto, por a usar la palabra—μακάριος, Jesús asociaó con ambos la Ley y las Profetas las cuales añaria seriedad en el contexto de una audiencia Judia del siglo primero.

Pobre?

Los comentaristas de hoy destacan normalmente por la expresión, “los pobres en espíritu” (οἱ πτωχοὶ τῷ πνεύματι), que no se usa en ningua otra parte en la Biblia. La versión de las Bienaventuranzas de Lucas refiere solamente a la pobre (πτωχοὶ), como en: “Honrados son ustedes los pobres, porque de ustedes es el reino de Dios” (Luke 6:20). Pobre aquí se refiere no solo a los bajos ingresos, sino a la mendicidad de la indigencia: alguien completamente dependiente de Dios (Neyrey 1998, 170–171).  Mateo, a diferencia de Lucas, fue un discípulo de Jesus, que hace probable lo que su frase, “los pobres en espíritu,” sea más precisa.

Hiperbólica?

En conjunto, la primera Bienaventuranza aparece hiperbólica por dos razones. La primera razón es que Jesús usa una forma prestada de ley de caso, si X entonces Y. Usar una forma legal sugiere algo como la lectura de un testamento. La segunda razón es que Jesús asocia cosas las que ninguna se asocia normalmente. A diferencia de los príncipes, los pobres generalmente no heredan reinos; reyes (aquellos con reinos) no son normalmente humildes. Por esta razón, la primera Bienaventuranza sugiere por su forma y contenido que Jesús esta usando hipérbole para calentar a su audiencia por cual es obviamente una discusión seria (Isa 42:1–3).

Reino de los Cielos

La seriedad surge porque la frase, “reino de los cielos,” previamente se asoció con juicio, como en:  “Arrepiéntanse, porque el reino de los cielos se ha acercado” (Matt 3:2, 4:17). El juicio puede estar implícito en el reverso de esta Bienaventuranza—son aquellos que se niegan a ser pobre en espíritu (los orgullosos) se oponen del “reino de  los cielos”? Potencialmente, si. Dos candidatos para juicio son dados casi de inmediato:  

Cualquiera, pues, que anule uno solo de estos mandamientos, aun de los más pequeños, y así lo enseñe a otros, será llamado muy pequeño en el reino de los cielos; pero cualquiera que los guarde y los enseñe, éste será llamado grande en el reino de los cielos. Porque les digo a ustedes que si su justicia no supera la de los escribas y Fariseos, no entrarán en el reino de los cielos. (Matt 5:19-20)

Los menos en el reinos del cielos son los quien enseñan contra la ley y los que no deben ser admitido son los menos justos que los escribas y fariseos, según las propias palabras de Jesús  (Matt 5:20).

Jesús elige palabras cuidadosamente.

Referencias

Crawford, Evans E. and Thomas H. Troeger. 1995. The Hum: Call and Response in African American Preaching. Nashville: Abingdon Press.

Neyrey, Jerome H. 1998. Honor and Shame in the Gospel of Matthew. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Spangler, Ann and Lois Tverberg. 2009. Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: How the Jewishness of Jesus Can Transform Your Faith. Grand Rapids: Zondervan.

Honrado Son los Pobres en Espírit

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

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Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Sitio del editor: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Lester: Threats to Self and Values Evoke Anger

Lester_review_20200128 Andrew D. Lester. 2007. Anger: Discovering Your Spiritual Ally. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

During my chaplaincy training in a psych ward, I had an elderly patient who had an anger management problem. He frequently got into altercations with other patients and would get violently angry when staff members served him the wrong foods. In talking with him, he claims to have murdered a man and have served 7 years in jail for this crime. He also ruminated about assaulting annoying patients but, being partially paralyzed with a stroke, was physically incapable of acting on his ruminations. Efforts to work with him on his anger problem proved ineffective.

Introduction

Being curious on how to work more effectively with such patients led me to Andrew Lester’s book, Anger: Discovering Your Spiritual Ally.  This book is a popular version of a more detailed and technical book: The Angry Christian: A Theology of Care and Counseling also by Westminster John Knox Press (2003).

Defining Anger

Lester observes that we get angry when we feel threatened.  While we could be angry because of a physical threat, most often we get angry because of psychological threats:  threats to our values, our beliefs about right and wrong, our expectations about the way good people should act… (14). When threatened: The intensity of our response depends on the amount of personal investment we have in the values, beliefs, and means that are being threatened (28).  Following this “threat model” of anger, our first responsibility when we get angry is to recognize that we feel threatened and to identify the nature of the threat (29).  Anger always has an object.

Anger Model

In copying with anger, Lester presents a 6 step model:

  1. Recognize anger;
  2. Acknowledge anger;
  3. Calming our bodies;
  4. Understanding why we are threatened;
  5. Evaluating the validity of the threat; and
  6. Communicating anger appropriately (62).

This list sounds suspiciously like how other authors suggest speakers cope with hostile questions—anger is often suppressed and expressed in a devious manner [1].  Lester notes that anger is often camouflaged as procrastination; actions that frustrate, embarrass or causes others pain; nasty humor; nagging; silence; sexual deviance; and passive-aggressive behavior (88-89).  My chronically angry patient, for example, was probably abused at some point—probably in prison—and this abuse returned as uncontrolled anger (84).

Does God Express Anger?

Does God get angry?  Did Jesus get angry? [2]  Lester notes that Jesus was fully human and is portrayed in the New Testament as a person with the full range of human emotion, including anger (46)  For example, Jesus asks:

Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill? But they were silent.  And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, Stretch out your hand. He stretched it out, and his hand was restored (Mark 3:4-5 ESV).

Lester observes that God is not normally thought to be vulnerable, but following the threat model of anger God’s values—justice and love [3]—are sometimes threatened in ways that could evoke anger.  Lester believes that God’s wrath is particularly associated with defense of his compassion and love—neither arbitrary nor capricious like other gods of antiquity (56).

A biblical scholar would note that God wrath (in the form of curses) is required by the Mosaic covenant:   

But if you will not obey the voice of the LORD your God or be careful to do all his commandments and his statutes that I command you today, then all these curses shall come upon you and overtake you (Deuteronomy 28:15 ESV). 

If covenantal obligations require God’s response to transgressions by the Nation of Israel [4] in the form of curses, then how much more would God’s wrath be poured out on those Gentiles, such as the Canaanites, that ignore him and trample on his law and gospel?  Lester’s threat model is helpful in biblical interpretation, for example, in the conquest of Canaan and, later, the Jewish exile to Babylon—even if postmodern sentiments are offended.  In effect, values (laws and treaties) undefended are not really values.

Outline of Book

Lester’s Anger is a short book written in 7 chapters, including:

  1. Reconsidering Anger;
  2. Why Do We Get Angry;
  3. What Does the Bible Say?
  4. Did Jesus Get Angry?  (And What about God?);
  5. Dealing with Anger Creatively;
  6. Anger Can Be Destructive; and
  7. Anger as a Spiritual Friend.

These chapters are preceded by a preface and followed by conclusions.

Assessment

A lot more could be said about Lester’s work.  I was impressed by Lester’s comment about the role of anger.  Anger always has an object.  Some objects of anger are righteous; many are not [5].  Like Jesus himself, a good Christian should express appropriate anger at injustice, idolatry, and innocent suffering (58,109).  Looking around today at the blatant immorality and abuses of human dignity, where is the indignation?  Where is the outrage?  Anger is sometimes appropriate.

Footnotes

[1] See, for example, review (http://wp.me/p3Xeut-8o).

[2] Also see post (http://wp.me/p3Xeut-75).

[3] Lester (55) cites:  O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? (Micah 6:8 ESV)

[4] Consider the commissioning of the Prophet Ezekiel (Ezekiel 3:18-21 ESV).  Even God’s prophet must honor the boundaries that God lays out for him or his salvation will be at risk. [5] The Apostle Paul reminds us:  Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil (Ephesians 4:26-27 ESV).

Lester: Threats to Self and Values Evoke Anger

Also see:

Elliott: God’s Emotions Inform Our Emotions

Crucial Conversations Target Productive Dialog

Plueddemann Demystified Leadership Across Culture

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Corner_2020

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The Beatitudes: Monday Monologues, Podcast on February 10, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a  prayer and reflect on the Beatitudes. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.Beatitude

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

The Beatitudes: Monday Monologues, Podcast on February 10, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Corner_2020

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Prayer and Blessing

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Lord of Lords, Prince of Peace, Spirit of Holiness,

We praise you for blessing us with life, a vision of how to live it, and a family to share it with.

We praise you for your faithful presence on good days and not so good days.

Forgive our pride and willfulness.

Forgive us for sins against you and sins against those around us.

Plant in us the seeds of forgiveness and the patience to watch them grow.

Plant in us the desire to follow you and to prosper your kingdom.

Let us use our blessings to bless others (Gen 12:2–3)—blessing not only those easy to love but also those who need our love.

Grant us strength for the day, grace for those we meet, and peace in all things.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer and Blessing

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

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Oración y Bendición

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Señor de Señores, Principe de Paz, Espíritu de Santidad,

Te alabamos por bendecirnos con vida, una visión de cómo vivirla y una familia con quien compartirla.

Te alabamos por tu presencia fiel en días buenos y no tan buenos.

Perdona nuestro orgullo y obstinación. Perdónanos por pecados contra tí y pecados contra aquellos que nos rodean.

Planta las semillas de perdón en nosotros y la paciencia para verlos crecer.

Planta en nosotros el deseo de seguirte y prosperar tu reino.

Usemos nuestras bendiciones a bendecir a los demás (Gen 12:2-3)—no solo bendecir aquellos que son fáciles de amar sino también aquellos quienes necesitan nuestro amor.

Concédenos fortaleza para el día, gracia para aquellos con quienes nos encontramos y paz en todas las cosas.

En el nombre de Jesús, Amén.

Oración y Bendición

Ver también:

Oración del Creyente

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