Transformation: Monday Monologues (podcast) October 12, 2020

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Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on transformation. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Transformation: Monday Monologues (podcast) October 12, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer for Conviction

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By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Almighty and Compassionate Father,

The Bible says that through the power of the Holy Spirit, we are to become witnesses to our neighbors, the region, and the whole world (Acts 1:8). Convict us, Lord, that our witness reaches all in need.

The Bible says that Saul approved of Stephen’s execution and afterwards a great persecution arose (Acts 8:1). And that many churches were founded as the disciples were scattered by the Holy Spirit (Acts 11:19). And even the grand persecutor himself, Saul of Tarsus, was himself transformed into an evangelist who we know as Paul (Acts 9:5). Convict us, Lord, that our witness reaches all in need.

Grant us the mind of Christ that we might focus on your priorities, not our own. Transform our hearts that we might feel the things that you feel, not feelings of our own. That on the Day of Judgment, we will be judged according to Christ’s righteousness, not our own. In the power of your Holy Spirit, give us eyes that see and ears that hear and feet that obey. In Jesus’ precious name, Amen.

Prayer of Conviction

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

 

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Oración por Convicción

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Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Padre todopoderoso y compasivo,

La Biblia dice que a través del poder del Espíritu Santo, debemos ser testigos a nuestros prójimos, la región, y el mundo entero (Acts 1.8). Danos la convicción de fe, Señor, que nuestro testimonio llega a todos los necesitados.

La Biblia dice que Saúl aprobó la ejecución de Esteban y luego surgió una gran persecución (Acts 8:1). Y que muchas iglesia se establecieron cuando los discípulos eran esparcidos por el Espíritu Santo (Acts 11:19). Y incluso el gran perseguidor, Saulo de Tarsus, fue si mismo transformado en un evangelista a quien conocemos como Pablo (Acts 9:5). Danos la convicción de fe, Señor, que nuestro testimonio llega a todos los necesitados.

Concédenos la mente de Cristo para que podamos centrarnos en tus prioridades, no en las nuestras. 

Transforma nuestros corazones para que podamos sentir las cosas que tú sientes, no las nuestras. Que en el día del juicio, seremos juzgados de acuerdo con la justicia de Cristo, no con la nuestra.

En el poder de tu Espíritu Santo, danos oyos que vean y oídos que escuchan y pies que obedezcan. En en precioso nombre de Jesús, Amén.

Oración por Convicción

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

Otras formas de participar en línea:

Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Sitio del editor: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Boletín informativo: https://bit.ly/TestWater_2020

 

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Persecution Can Be Transformative

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And Saul approved of his [Stephen’s] execution. 

And there arose on that day a great persecution against the church in Jerusalem, and 

they were all scattered throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, 

except the apostles. (Acts 8:1)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

In my grandparents’ home, every meal began with prayer and ended with a scripture reading. One time in college when I visited, I read the story of Stephen: “This man never ceases to speak words against this holy place and the law, for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs that Moses delivered to us.“ (Acts 6:13-14) Stephen offered no defense, but rather he accused the Jews of false worship and not keeping the law (Acts 7:48, 53). Then, he reminded them of Jesus’ words during his trial: “But I tell you, from now on you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of Power and coming on the clouds of heaven.” (Matt 26:64) Here Jesus paraphrased Daniel 7:13 in a clear claim of divinity. This claim drove the Sanhedrin crazy and in a fit of rage they stoned Stephen, an act illegal under Roman law (John 18:31).

After the execution of Stephen, the Book of Acts introduces Saul (Acts 7:58) who, not only approved of Stephen’s stoning, but led the persecution of Christians in Jerusalem that followed, ravaging the church (Acts 8:1–3). The word, ravage, suggests a self-destructive manner, as in the proverb: “When a man’s folly brings his way to ruin, his heart rages against the LORD.” (Prov 19:3) This manner of persecution confirms Saul’s own testimony that he was a zealous persecutor (Acts 8:1; Phil 3:6).

In leading the persecution of the church, Saul assists in scattering the Jerusalem disciples to both the regions of Judea and Samaria. This fulfilled the first two parts of the commission of Christ in Acts 1:8 and he was aided by disciples who shared the Gospel as they fled Jerusalem (Acts 8:4). Thus, even at his worst Saul acts as an unwilling, unknowing instrument of the Holy Spirit as he accomplishes Jesus’ charge in Acts 1.8, cited earlier.

When Saul sets out to oppose the third part of Christ’s commission in the scattering by going to Damascus, however, the risen Christ intervenes, preventing him from further self-destruction, saying: “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” (Acts 9:4). To this question, Saul responds: “Who are you, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. But rise and enter the city, and you will be told what you are to do.” (Acts 9:5–6) This is in stark contrast with the response of Judas Iscariot who commits suicide (Matt 27:5). Even before he was even aware, the Apostle Paul, formerly Saul, served God’s purposes even in persecuting the church and, in doing so, was driven painfully towards his own conversion and call (Acts 9:15-16).

Persecution often traumatizes us, leaving deeper wounds than most other things. On an individual level, this trauma can lead to lifelong emotional and psychiatric issues, and, if we then turn into our pain and away from God, can be intensified by spiritual confusion. On a communal level, persecution can be followed by a cycle of revenge between warring communities. At either level, those persecuted and those persecuting are bound in an indelible, negative bond that is not easily broken.

Forgiveness breaks the bond created by abuse and persecution, and makes room for God’s Holy Spirit to work in our lives (Rom 12:19). Stephen died praying to God for the forgiveness of his persecutors: “Lord, do not hold this sin against them.” (Acts 7:60), paraphrasing Christ’s own words from the cross (Luke 23:34). As one of those persecutors, Paul never forgot Stephen and mentioned him as he recounted his own conversion before the Sanhedrin. Was Paul’s conversion God’s answer to Stephen’s prayer? (Acts 22:20).

Another important consequence of the Jerusalem persecution was that the Holy Spirit worked to establish the first gentile church in Antioch, as we read:

Now those who were scattered because of the persecution that arose over Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia and Cyprus and Antioch, speaking the word to no one except Jews. But there were some of them, men of Cyprus and Cyrene, who on coming to Antioch spoke to the Hellenists also, preaching the Lord Jesus. And the hand of the Lord was with them, and a great number who believed turned to the Lord. (Acts 11:19–21)

The key word in the Greek is scattered, which only appears one other place in Acts 8:4: “Now those who were scattered [by Saul’s persecution] went about preaching the word.” The word, scattered, infers an action of the  wind and the word for wind in the Greek is pneuma, which also translates as Holy Spirit. The inference is that the Holy Spirit established the church at Antioch in response to persecution (Acts 11:22).

Because the apostles remained in Jerusalem at this point, the Holy Spirit used ordinary disciples, whose names remain unknown, to establish the Antioch Church and churches throughout “all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” (Acts 1:8) It is much like God has used Pentecostal evangelists in our own time to reach much of the known world (IBMR 2015, 29).  much like God has used Pentecostal evangelists in our own time to reach much of the known world (IBMR 2015, 29). And in many places around the world, persecution remains ever present.

Persecution Can Be Transformative

Also see:

Preface to a Life in Tension

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

 

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Persecución puede ser Transformadora

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Y Saulo (Pablo) estaba de completo acuerdo con ellos en su [Esteban] muerte. 

En aquel día se desató una gran persecución en contra de la iglesia en Jerusalén, y 

todos fueron esparcidos por las regiones de Judea y Samaria, 

excepto los apóstoles. (Acts 8:1)

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

En la casa de mis abuelos, cada comida comenzó con oración y terminó con una lectura de las Escrituras. Una vez en la universidad cuando visité, leí la historia de Esteban: “Presentaron testigos falsos que dijeron:“Este hombre continuamente habla en contra de este lugar santo y de la Ley; porque le hemos oído decir que este Nazareno, Jesús, destruirá este lugar, y cambiará las tradiciones que Moisés nos dejó.” (Acts 6:13-14) Esteban  no ofreció una defensa, sino que acusó a los judíos de adorar falsamente y de no guardar la ley. (Acts 7:48, 53) Luego, les recordó las palabras de Jesús durante su juicio: “Tú mismo lo has dicho; sin embargo, a ustedes les digo que desde ahora verán al hijo de hombre sentado a la diestra del poder, y viniendo sobre las nubes de cielo.” (Matt 26:64) Aquí Jesús parafraseó a Daniel 7:13 en un claro reclamo de divinidad. Este reclamo enloqueció al Sanedrín y en un ataque de ira apedrearon a Esteban, un acto ilegal según la ley romana.(John 18:31)

Después de la ejecución de Esteban, el Libro de los Hechos presenta a Saulo (Hechos 7:58) quien, no solo aprobó la lapidación de Esteban, sino que dirigió la persecución de los cristianos en Jerusalén que siguió, hacer estragos la iglesia (Acts 8:1–3). La palabra, estragos, sugiere una autodestructiva mañera, como en el proverbio: “La insensatez del hombre pervierte su camino, Y su corazón se irrita contra el SEÑOR.” (Prov 19:3) 

Esta forma de persecución confirma el testimonio de Saúl de que él era un perseguidor entusiasta (Acts 8:1; Phil 3:6).

En líderar la persecución de la Iglesia, Saulo ayuda a esparcider los discípulos de Jerusalén a ambos los regiones de Judea y Samaria. Esto cumplió las dos primeras partes de la comisión de Cristo en Hechos 1:8, ayudado por discípulos que compartieron el Evangelio mientras huían de Jerusalén (Acts 8:4). Por lo tanto, incluso en su peor momento, Saúl actúa como un instrumento involuntario e ignorante del Espíritu Santo al cumplir la acusación de Jesús en Hechos 1.8, citado anteriormente.

Cuando Saulo deja para oponer la tercera parte de la comisión de Cristo en la esparcider por ir a Damasco, sin embargo, Cristo resucitado intervene, preventirlo de más autodestrucción, diciendo: “Al caer a tierra, oyó una voz que le decía: Saulo, Saulo, ¿por qué Me persigues?” (Acts 9:4) A esta pregunta, Saulo responde: “¿Quién eres, Señor? preguntó Saulo. El Señor respondió: Yo soy Jesús a quien tú persigues; levántate, entra en la ciudad, y se te dirá lo que debes hacer.” (Acts 9:5–6) Esto está en marcado contraste con la respuesta de Judas Iscariote quien comita suicidio (Matt 27.5). Incluso antes de darse cuenta, el apóstol Pablo, anteriormente Saulo, cumplió los propósitos de Dios incluso en la persecución de la iglesia y, al hacerlo, fue impulsado dolorosamente hacia su propia conversión y llamado (Acts 9:15–16).

La persecución a menudo nos traumatiza, dejando heridas más profundas que la mayoría de las otras cosas. A nivel individual, este trauma puede conducir a problemas emocionales y psiquiátricos de por vida y, si luego giramos a nuestro dolor y nos alejamos de Dios, puede intensificarse por la confusión espiritual. A nivel comunitario, la persecución puede ser seguida por un ciclo de venganza entre las comunidades en guerra. En cualquier nivel, los perseguidos y los perseguidores están atados en un vínculo indeleble y negativo que no se rompe fácilmente.

El perdón rompe el vínculo creado por abuso y persecución, y deja espacio para para que el Espíritu Santo de Dios trabaje en nuestras vidas. (Rom 12:19) Esteban murió rezando a Dios por el perdón de sus perseguidores: “Señor, no les tomes en cuenta este pecado.” (Acts 7:60), parafraseando las propias palabras de Cristo desde la cruz  (Luke 23:34). Como uno de esos perseguidores, Pablo nunca olvidó a Esteban y lo mencionó mientras contaba su propia conversión ante el Sanedrín. ¿Fue la conversión de Pablo la respuesta de Dios a la oración de Esteban? (Acts 22:20)

Otra consecuencia importante de la persecución en Jerusalén fue que el Espíritu Santo trabajó para establecer la primera iglesia gentil en Antioquía, como leemos:

Ahora bien, los que habían sido esparcidos a causa de la persecución (tribulación) que sobrevino después de la muerte de Esteban, llegaron hasta Fenicia, Chipre y Antioquía, no hablando la palabra a nadie, sino sólo a los Judíos. Pero había algunos de ellos, hombres de Chipre y de Cirene, los cuales al llegar a Antioquía, hablaban también a los Griegos, predicando el evangelio (las buenas nuevas) del Señor Jesús.  La mano del Señor estaba con ellos, y gran número que creyó se convirtió al Señor.  (Acts 11:19–21)

La palabra clave en griego está esparcidos la que solo aparece en una otra lugar en Hechos 8.4: “Así que los que habían sido esparcidos iban predicando (anunciando las buenas nuevas de) la palabra.” La palabra, esparcidos, infiere una acción del viento y la palabra para viento en el griego es pneuma que también se traduce como Espíritu Santo. La inferencia es que el Espíritu Santo estableció la iglesia de Antioquía en respuesta a la persecución (Acts 11:22).

Porque los apóstoles quedan en Jerusalén a esta punta, el Espíritu Santo usaron ordinario discípulos, suyos nombre permanecen desconocido, para establecer la iglesia Antioquía y las iglesias a través de: “toda Judea y Samaria, y hasta los confines de la tierra.” (Acts 1:8) Es muy parecido a que Dios ha usado evangelistas Pentecostales en nuestro propio tiempo para llegar a gran parte del mundo conocido. (IBMR 2015, 29) Y en muchos lugares alrededor el mundo, la persecución permanece siempre presente.

Persecución puede ser Transformadora

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

Otras formas de participar en línea:

Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Sitio del editor: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Boletín informativo: https://bit.ly/TestWater_2020

 

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Case and Deaton Examine Rising Mortality Rates, Part 2

Deaths of Despair

Anne Case and Angus Deaton. 2020. Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Part 1)

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

The last serious debate on economic policy occurred in the Reagan Administration in the 1980s. The high inflation rates that dogged the U.S. economy in the 1970s prompted this debate that focused on U.S. competitiveness in world markets. The debate focused on excessive government regulation, high labor costs due to union influence, and restraints on growth of U.S. corporations that were considered too small to compete effectively with large, vertically-integrated Japanese and German firms. The Administration accordingly promoted deregulation, reducing union influence, and merger of firms into large conglomerates. Since then, large conglomerates have not only dominated U.S. markets, but also U.S. politics and cultural life.

 The Cost of U.S. Healthcare

Probably the most stunning observation that Anne Case and Deaton make in their book, Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, is that:

“In 2017, the Swiss lived 5.1 years longer than Americans but spent 30 percent less per person; other countries achieve a similar length of life for still fewer health dollars. Expenditures on healthcare in 2017 was 17.9 percent of GDP [gross domestic product] om the United States; the next highest in the world was Switzerland at 12.3 percent. If a fairy godmother were somehow to reduce the share of healthcare in American GDP not to the average of rich countries but, less ambitiously, only to the second highest, Switzerland, 5.6 percent of GDP would be available for other things, freeing up more than a trillion dollars. That is more than $3,000 a year for each man, woman, and child in the U.S., or about $8,300 for each household.” (194)

If this money were well-spent, we would expect that life expectancy would be higher in the U.S. than other developed countries, but the opposite is true. Among the 25 other members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the U.S. has the lowest life expectancy. The next lowest life expectancy is seen in Germany, where people live an average of two and half years longer than in the U.S. (195). Case and Deaton basically argue that our healthcare dollars are not only poorly spent, they are a drag on economic growth.

Trade Offs

If healthcare costs are so high and retard economic growth, how come most people are unaware of the costs and how come more people aren’t covered by health insurance? The short answer is that healthcare costs are billed indirectly, showing up as employer contributions and tax expenses. Hidden charges are more likely to encourage overcharging. Case and Deaton report:

“In 2018, the healthcare industry employed 2,829 lobbyists, more than 5 for each member of Congress…It is the largest-spending industry, larger even than the financial industry, and spends more than ten times as much as the total spent by organized labor…Obamacare was passed without consideration of a single-payer system [to reduce costs] or a public option…Hospitals, doctors, and pharma companies were effectively paid off in order to support the passage of the Affordable Care Act.” (210)

Case and Deaton observe:

“Medicaid rose from 20.5 percent of state spending in 2008 to an estimated 29.7 percent in 2018, while spending on primary and secondary education fell from 22 percent to 19.6 percent.” (207)

Medicaid benefits those unable to pay, often single mothers and the elderly, while education subsidizes presumably serve to increase the productivity of our young people, promoting economic growth.

Because healthcare costs are a larger percentage of the salaries of lower-paid workers, the incentive to hire lower paid workers from separate staffing firms that do not offer such benefits is enormous. The employment of temps lowers firm costs, but has the unintended effect of making it harder for less-educated employees to progress into better paying jobs that offer such benefits—the career ladder effectively that might have existed in years past simply no longer exists. Class distinctions have hardened as college graduates are employed by separate firms whose separation is motivated by the high cost of healthcare.

Although Case and Deaton fail to mention it, attaching the higher cost of healthcare to firms rather than to the government makes U.S. firms less competitive in world markets. Most other nations pay for their healthcare through taxes rather than employer contributions. This is factor in the off-shoring of U.S. manufacturing since the 1980s.

Assessment

 In part one of this review, I offered an overview and focused on changes affecting individuals. In part two I have discussed the broader economic environment that brought about these outcomes.

Anne Case and Deaton’s Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism provides a detailed look into the disturbing problem of declining life expectancy in America. While in the past poor economic performance has usually been attributed to the entry of poorly educated immigrants, racism, or a multicycle of poverty, the authors point to growing class distinctions correlated with college graduation, an oligopolistic corporate structure, and changing trends in the workforce. Deaths of despair uniquely affect non-Hispanic, white American men. Blue-collar European men face the same economic reality, but have a healthcare plan and have a longer life-expectancy.

This book is well written and documented. It should be required reading for those studying economics and cultural trends, especially presidential candidates

Case and Deaton Examine Rising Mortality Rates, Part 2

Also see:

Nouwen: Make Space for Self, Others, and God 

Vanhoozer: How Do We Understand the Bible? Part 1 

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

 

Continue Reading

Case and Deaton Examine Rising Mortality Rates, Part 1

Deaths of Despair

Anne Case and Angus Deaton. 2020. Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Part 2)

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

Even before the corona virus pandemic, life has been difficult for many Americans. For those without a college degree, real incomes have been flat or declining since around 1980. In recent years, we have seen multiple years of declining life expectancy and record levels of suicide, drug overdoses, and opioid deaths. Adding insult to injury, mainstream politicians of both parties have mostly ignored these problems. When I heard about Anne Case and Angus Deaton’s book, Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, I immediately ordered a copy.

Introduction

When it is reported that life expectancy has been declining in the United States in recent years, the implication is that death (or mortality) rates are rising. Case and Deaton write:

“Deaths from alcoholic liver disease were rising rapidly too so that the fastest-rising death rates were from three causes: suicides, drug overdoses, and alcoholic liver disease…deaths of despair…The book is about these deaths and about the people who are dying.” (2)

These deaths of despair are preventable, not happening in other industrialized countries, and primarily among middle-aged white, non-Hispanic men (4)—the ones commonly described in popular culture as those benefitting from “white” privilege, which has vaporized in this generation (5). Case Deaton observe:

“The widening gap between those with and without a bachelor’s degree is not only in death, but also in quality of life; those without a degree are seeing increases in their levels of pain, ill heath, and serious mental distress, and declines in their ability to work and to socialize. The gap is also widening in earnings, in family stability, and in community. A four-year degree has become the key marker of social status.” (3)

In part one of this review, I will offer an overview and focus on changes affecting individuals. In part two I will discuss the economic environment that brought about these outcomes.

Background and Organization

Anne Case and Angus Deaton are economists emeriti of the faculty of Princeton University. Deaton won the Nobel Prize for economics in 2015.

Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism is written in sixteen chapters divided into four papers:

PART I. PAST AS PROLOGUE

  1. The Calm before the Storm
  2. Things Come Apart
  3. Deaths of Despair

PART II. THE ANATOMY OF THE BATTLEFIELD

  1. The Lives and Deaths of the More (or Less) Educated
  2. Black and White Deaths
  3. The Health of the Living
  4. The Misery and Mystery of Pain
  5. Suicide, Drugs, and Alcohol
  6. Opioids

PART III. WHAT”S THE ECONOMY GOT TO DO WITH IT?

  1. False Trails: Poverty, Income, and the Great Recession
  2. Growing Apart at Work
  3. Widening Gaps at Home

PART IV. WHY IS CAPITALISM FAILING SO MANY?

  1. How American Healthcare is Undermining Lives
  2. Capitalism, Immigrants, Robots, and China
  3. Firms, Consumers, and Workers
  4. What to Do? (vii)

These chapters are preceded by a preface and introduction, and followed by Acknowledgments, Notes, and an index.

Dimming Prospects

A key motivator for writing about deaths of despair starts with a stark economic reality:

“After correction for inflation, the median wages of American men have been stagnant for half a century; for white men without a four- degree, median earnings lost 13 percent of their purchasing power between between 1979 and 2017…. Since the end of the Great Recession, between January 2010 and January 2019 nearly sixteen million new jobs were created, but fewer than three million were for those without a four-year degree. Only fifty-five thousand were for those with only a high school degree.” (7)

The easy summary of this problem is to observe that less educated white American men are substantially less able to participate in the American dream of having a good paying job, a family, a house, medical and pension benefits. Here are talking about 38 percent of the working-age population (4).  Case and Deaton observe:

“Our story of deaths of despair; of pain; of addiction, alcoholism, and suicide; of worse jobs with lower wages; of declining marriage; and of declining religion is mostly a story of non-Hispanic white Americans without a four-year degree.” (4)

Less money, less connection, less religion, less life-expectancy. Without a job, white men are simply shamed as losers. This shame and guilt is currently being turned inward, but the authors note that this is likely soon to turn outward into violence (14). The current political climate suggests that this later outcome is not far off.

Assessment

Anne Case and Deaton’s Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism provides a detailed look into the disturbing problem of declining life expectancy in America. While in the past poor economic performance has usually been attributed to the entry of poorly educated immigrants, racism, or a multicycle of poverty, the authors point to growing class distinctions correlated with college graduation, an oligopolistic corporate structure, and changing trends in the workforce. Deaths of despair uniquely affect non-Hispanic, white American men. Blue-collar European men face the same economic reality, but have a healthcare plan and have a longer life-expectancy.

This book is well written and documented. It should be required reading for those studying economics and cultural trends, especially presidential candidates.

Case and Deaton Examine Rising Mortality Rates, Part 1

Also see:

Nouwen: Make Space for Self, Others, and God 

Vanhoozer: How Do We Understand the Bible? Part 1 

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com

 

Continue Reading

Salvation: Monday Monologues (podcast) October 5, 2020

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Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on salvation. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Salvation: Monday Monologues (podcast) October 5, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Prayer for All Seasons

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Almighty God,

In our youth, you gave us the law so that our feet would not stumble. In our mid-life journey where scholars offer knowledge and computers offer information, you offer us wisdom.

In our seniority you rewarded our sacrifices, giving our vineyard and trees great fruit. We praise you and give you the glory.

You have swallowed up death forever, wiped away our tears, and set our feet on solid ground setting straight the reproach of our enemies (Isa 25:8). We praise you and give you the glory.

Remember now your church in the storms of deprivation, national strife, and scandalous trials.

Give your people eyes that see, ears that hear, and leaders that lead where you would have us go.

Bless us with your conspicuous presence by the power of your Holy Spirit and in Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer for All Seasons

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

 

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Oración por Todas las Estaciones

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Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Dios Todopoderoso, 

En nuestra juventud, nos diste la ley para que nuestros pies no tropezaran.

En nuestro viaje de mediana edad donde los académicos ofrecen conocimiento y las computadoras ofrecen información, tú nos ofreces sabiduría.

En nuestra antigüedad, premiaste nuestros sacrificios, dando a nuestros viñedos y árboles una gran fruta. Te alabamos y te damos la gloria.

Has tragado la muerte para siempre, enjuagaste nuestras lágrimas, y pusiste nuestros pies en tierra firme, remuendo el reproche de nuestros enemigos (Isa 25:8).  Te alabamos y te damos la gloria.

Recuerde ahora tu iglesia en las tormentas de privación, luchas nacionales, y juicios escandalosos.

Da tu gente ojos que ven, oídos que escuchen, y líderes que nos dirijan a donde tú nos mandes ir.

Bendícenos con tu conspicuosa presencia en el poder de tu Espíritu Santo y en el nombre de Jesús, Amén.

Oración por Todas las Estaciones

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

Otras formas de participar en línea:

Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Sitio del editor: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Boletín informativo: https://bit.ly/TestWater_2020

 

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