La Muerte Significa Resurrección

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Y cuando Jesús la vio llorando, y a los Judíos

que vinieron con ella llorando también, 

se conmovió profundamente en el espíritu, y se entristeció.

¿Dónde lo pusieron? . . . Habiendo dicho esto,

gritó con fuerte voz: ¡Lázaro, sal fuera! 

(John 11:33-34, 43)

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Esta forma de dos partes de un lamento nos pone en un viaje espiritual. Cuando Jesús llora, los muertos resucitan (Mark 5:38–41). Cuando Jesús muere, nuestras vidas se redentan y encontramos esperanza (1 Pet 1:3), como el Apóstol Pablo escribe:  

y conocerlo a el, el poder de Su resurrección y la participación en sus padecimientos, llegando a ser como el en su muerte, a fin de llegar a la resurrección de entre los muertos. (Phil 3:10-11)

Pablo nos aconseja que imitamos a Cristo y que pongamos nuestra emociones en el servicio de Dios (e.g. Rom 12:14–15) para que el mundo físico mismo pueda también ser redimido (Rom 8:22).

La esperanza redima nuestro luto. La esperanza de la resurrección permitenos a mirar más allá del dolor en esta vida hacia nuestro futuro en Cristo, como el Profeta Jeremías escribió tan elegantamente:

Porque yo sé los planes que tengo para ustedes, declara el SEÑOR planes de bienestar y no de calamidad, para darles un futuro y una esperanza. (Jer 29:11)

Escuchamos un eco de Jeremias en el Sermón del Monte, cuando escribe sobre la ansiedad:

Por eso les digo, no se preocupen por su vida, qué comerán o qué beberán; ni por su cuerpo, qué vestirán. ¿No es la vida más que el alimento y el cuerpo más que la ropa? (Matt 6:25)

La ansiedad es una forma de duelo sobre los desafíos diarios de la vida—qué comer o qué ropar—en una especie de desesperación por las circunstancias actuales.

Como Cristianos, sabemos que circunstancias actuales dan paso a un futuro en Cristo—la muerte no tiene la última palabra (1 Thess 4:13). Debido a que nuestro futuro está en Cristo, somos como hijos que pueden deleitarse en escuchando historias de miedo por que saber que las historias tienen un final feliz. El Apostle Pablo escribe: 

Porque la tristeza [θεὸν λύπη; “theo lupe”] que es conforme a la voluntad de Dios produce un arrepentimiento que conduce a la salvación, sin dejar pesar; pero la tristeza del mundo produce muerte. (2 Cor 7:10)

La palabra para la tristeza que Pablo usa significa: “dolor mental o espíritual, dolor, tristeza, aflicción” (BDAG 4625).⁠1 Nos afligimos por nuestro pecado; nos lamentamos por nuestra fragilidad; y una vez lo hemos derramado todo, nos volvemos a Dios y nos arrepentimos, como escribe el salmista:

Los que siembran con lágrimas, segarán con gritos de júbilo. El que con lágrimas anda, llevando la semilla de la siembra, En verdad volverá con gritos de alegría, trayendo sus gavillas. (Ps 126:5-6)

Este suena similar de la versión de Lucas de la segunda Beatitud: “Honrdado ustedes los que ahora lloran, porque reirán” (Luke 6:21).

A través del dolor piadoso y arrepentimiento Dios nos conduce suavemente a salvación. 

Notas

1 The word for grief that Paul uses means: “pain of mind or spirit, grief, sorrow, affliction” (BDAG 4625).

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

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Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

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Water Cooler Observations, March 25, 2020

Hiemstra_FHFA_02052009By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Those of you who know me know that in my first career, I was a financial engineer and economist with various federal agencies, as the photo to the right shows.

Starting Wednesday, March 25, 2020, I am going to lean into my background as a recovering economist to offer observations on our distracting world here on T2Pneuma.net. Let me know your questions if this piques your interest.

Corona Virus

During the past week, I was asked by a pastor friend to report on international corona virus statistics. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control,An agency of the European Union, reports daily case and deaths statistics for 166 nations around the world.

These statistics show that mortality rates different significantly by country and region. These differences reflected differing levels of testing, differences in the local spread of the virus, and differing intervention capabilities.

Corona Virus Cases, Deaths, and Mortality Rates by Region, March 24, 2020
Countries Region Cases Deaths Mortality Rates
Count Change Count Change
Western Europe 186,347 13.9% 10,108 16.5% 5.4%
Eastern Europe 5,374 14.9% 40 25.0% 0.7%
Africa 1,689 31.0% 52 23.8% 3.1%
Middle East 28,696 8.6% 1,881 7.9% 6.6%
Asia 96,397 0.8% 3,443 0.7% 3.6%
Australia and New Zealand 1,965 8.5% 7 0.0% 0.4%
Pacific 3,143 41.7% 134 14.5% 4.3%
Atlantic 13 0.0% 0 #DIV/0! 0.0%
North America 48,105 31.3% 614 25.6% 1.3%
Central America 927 13.9% 13 62.5% 1.4%
Caribbean 405 16.4% 5 0.0% 1.2%
Latin America 4,980 18.6% 68 28.3% 1.4%
World 378,041 11.7% 16,365 12.1% 4.3%
Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

Mortality rate hot spots include Italy (9.5 %), Indonesia (8.5 %), Iran (7.9 %),  Spain (6.6 %), UK (5.0 %), Netherlands (4.5 %), France (4.3 %), and China (4 %). This list changes daily. By contrast, the U.S. rate is 1.3 percent. Other countries with high rates do not report enough cases to have confidence in the figures.

This crisis will not end until the daily changes in the number of cases begins to decline and mortality rates begin to fall. Currently, worldwide the number of cases increased over yesterday by 11.7 percent and the average mortality rates for reported cases  was 4.3 percent.

Testing Implications

While most testing today is on patients with obvious symptoms, I look forward to a wider field of testing. South Korean data that I saw earlier in the week showed a significant number of young people testing positive who perhaps were asymptomatic.

Several aspects of this asymptomatic phenomena are important. While most commentators have focused on the potential for these people to spread the virus, we need to know who has effectively been inoculated. Before anyone talked about the corona virus in January, my wife was horribly sick with similar symptoms–she never previously took any sick leave. Afterwards, I had a head cold have self-quarantined the past two weeks. If either or both of us are now immune from getting corona virus, then we both need to be out helping others.

The punchline in this discussion is the question: when and how do we stand down safely as a nation from the quarantines? Politicians have begun to talk about this issue. Those who have recovered from the virus presumably have immunity and can safely return to work after some point, but we need to know from physicians when it is safe to do so.

Financial Implications

As a former financial regulator, I worry about the financial system with so many people out of work. Bank regulators normally are required by law and regulation to write off non-performing loans from capital after 90 days. By June, many institutions will be hitting that trigger. While regulators can waive these requirements temporarily, the longer this crisis lingers the more pressing the concern will be.

Insolvent banks are unlikely to make new loans and foreclosures will hit young workers and minorities harder than other groups whose employment is more secure. For those already strapped with student debt, the bind will grow even faster. This outcome could change election outcomes and permanently change people’s attitudes about credit and investing. My grandfather nearly lost the farm in the Great Depression of the 1930s and the experience forever changed his attitude about banking.

Regulators worry about insolvent banks because they have the perverse incentive to take risky bets. If you are going to fail anyway, why not bet the farm, so to speak? Changing accounting rules does not completely negate this effect because then bankers are investing someone else’s money, not their own.

Gethsemane Moment

When you are in pain or afraid, where do you turn? When Jesus was facing death in the Garden of Gethsemane, he turned to God instead of his pain and fear.

 Then Jesus went with them to a place called Gethsemane, and he said to his disciples, “Sit here, while I go over there and pray.” And taking with him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, he began to be sorrowful and troubled. Then he said to them, “My soul is very sorrowful, even to death; remain here, and watch with me.” And going a little farther he fell on his face and prayed, saying, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will.” (Matt. 26:36-39 ESV)

We face a Gethsemane Moment today worldwide. Where will you turn?

Water Cooler Observations, March 25, 2020

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: https://bit.ly/Meet_2020

 

 

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Crucial Conversations Target Productive Dialog

Crucial_Conversations_review_20200307By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler.  2012.  Crucial Conversations:  Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High.  New York:  McGraw-Hill.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

My economic studies taught me that decision processes focused on the scientific method—objective, dispassionate, well-thought out.  Boy, did that ever mislead me!  This misconcept left I unprepared for white-knuckle office negotiations and I despaired that I represented my own ideas poorly in discussions.  When McGraw-Hill published Crucial Conversations, I immediately ordered a copy.

Introduction

What is a crucial conversation?  The authors define a crucial conversation as:  a discussion between two or more people where (1) stakes are high, (2) opinions vary, and (3) emotions run strong (3).  They observe that three responses to these white-knock conversations can occur:  we can avoid them, handle them badly, or handle them well (4).  Their claim is that high-performance professionals earn their pay by telling supervisors discretely what they do not care to hear (10). The more typical response is silence (12).  The author further claim that open conversation allows organizations to respond more quicky to crises, have fewer on-the-job injuries, save money, reduce decision costs, and reduce workplace bullying (12-13).   Wow!

Organization

The authors organize Crucial Conversations into eleven chapters where the details matter less important than to stay in dialog.  A dialog is a two-way conversation where both parties contribute to the discussion (pool of information) and no one feels threatened.  Honesty and openness are keys to ongoing dialog.  Clearly, keeping the lines of communication open is important in avoiding becoming side-tracked. A key starting point is to know what you really want and stay on theme.  This is not easy because when tempers flare, people often personalize the discussion (punishing) and bring up unrelated grievances (whining). Not all wrongs can be righted (38-40).  Adrenaline poses its own problem.  Stay on theme.

Handy Tips

The authors provide a large number of handy tips for managing particular problems in crucial conversations. One tip worth the ticket of admission is the author’s breakdown of a dialog into four stages:  presenting facts (see and hear), telling a story, feeling, and acting.  They observe that once emotions take over actions get locked in.

The formation of productive stories presents the last best chance to channel a dialog towards useful action. An infinite number of stories can be told, but not all comport well with the facts or are organizationally helpful.  Three kinds of bad (clever) stories—victim, villain, and helpless stories—arise that are usually counter-productive (116-119).  Claiming victimhood means accepting no responsibility for what happens next or even offering to help turn things around.  The same is true for pointing a finger at a “villain” or claiming a lack of power to change things.   Avoiding these counter-productive stories lays the groundwork for telling stories that solve organizational problems.

Assessment

Crucial Conversations is a helpful book.  I have recommended this book to family members and close friends undergoing stressful workplace transitions.  This book challenges us to commit key debating strategies to memory.  White knuckle conversations often cannot always be anticipated and often take place without warning.  Consequently, read the book carefully, underline key points, and review these points before walking into stressful meetings.

Crucial Conversations Target Productive Dialog

Also see:

Savage Teaches Listening; Hears Unheard Stories 

Warren Writes to Grow Characters 

Books, Films, and Ministry

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Lament over Sin: Monday Monologues (podcast) March 23, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Lament over Sin. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Lament over Sin: Monday Monologues (podcast) March 23, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: https://bit.ly/Meet_2020

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Prayer for Presence

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Compassionate Father,

Be especially near me this morning—blot out my guilt; hide my shame; cover up my sin.

Though I am unworthy, share an intimate moment with me. Remind me of better times.

Grant me a new day in the sunshine of your mercy—a day when I could lose myself in your love and extend your love with abandon to those around me.

Open a bridge over the gaps that separate us—time and holiness and power—that I might spend more time with those around me, might share in your holy affections, might overcome my own weaknesses and bitterness, and turn to you, instead of into my pain, that I may experience godly, redemptive grief.

Through the power of your Holy Spirit and in Jesus’ name, Amen.

Prayer for Presence

Also see:

Believer’s Prayer

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net

Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: https://bit.ly/Meet_2020

 

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Oración de Presencia

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Padre compasivo,

Sea especialmente cerca de mí esta mañana—borrar mi culpa; esconder mi vergüenza; encubrir mi pecado.

Aunque soy indigno, comparta un momento íntimo conmigo. Recuérdame tiempos mejores.

Concédeme un dia nuevo en la solbrilla de tu misericordia—un día en que podría pérderme en tu amor y extiende tu amor con abandono a los que me rodean.

Abre un puente sobre las brechas que nos separa—tiempo y santidad y poder—para que pueda pasar más tiempo con los que me rodean, compartir en tus santos afectos, superar mi propias debilidades y amarguras, y recurrir a ti en lugar de mi dolor, para que pueda experimentar una pena piedoso y redemptivo.

A través del poder de tu Espíritu Santo y en el nombre de Jesús, Amén.

Oración de Presencia

Ver también:

Oración del Creyente

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Lament over Sin

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101Those who sow in tears 

shall reap with shouts of joy! 

(Ps 126:5)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

The Second Beatitude says those who mourn will be comforted, but what does God mourn for? In Genesis, God grieves over human wickedness:

The LORD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. And the LORD regretted that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. (Gen 6:5-6)

Human sin grieved God so much that he sent the flood, sparing only Noah, his family, and two of each animal (Gen 6:7-8).

Books of the Law

Elsewhere, studies of the word for mourning used in Matthew 5:4 in the Greek, associate it most often with grief over death. For example, Abraham mourns over the death of his wife, Sarah (Gen 23:2), and Joseph mourns over the death of his father, Jacob (Gen 50:3).

By contrast, studies of the word for crying used in Luke’s Beatitude (Luke 6:21) in the Greek, associate it most often with prayer in the midst of suffering. For example, a significant point in the life of Moses arose when as a baby he cried lying in the basket floating in the Nile. On hearing Moses’ cry, the daughter of Pharaoh is moved to rescue and to raise the child as her own, disobeying her father’s edict to drown all Hebrew baby boys—including Moses (Exod 1:22; 2:6). Later, Moses cries to the Lord in prayer to heal his sister, Miriam, who has been afflicted with leprosy, and she is healed (Num 12:13). By contrast, crying in the sense of whining or self-pity evokes God’s anger (Num 11:10).

Books of the Prophets

The focus of mourning shifts in the Books of the Prophets from death of a person to anguish—crying out over the fate of the nation of Israel (e.g. Jer 8:18–19).

Israel cried out to the Lord in anguish primarily because of the ups and downs of leadership in the four hundred years after the nation left Egypt. During these years Moses led the nation of Israel out of Egypt and Joshua led them into the Promised Land with strong charismatic leadership. But leadership weakened as they entered a period of the judges when, as today, “Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.” (Judg 17:6) During the time of the judges, a cycle of sin, trouble, revival, and restoration became the normal pattern (Younger 2002, 35). The turning point in this pattern arose when the people turned and cried out to the Lord to keep his promises:

And when all these things come upon you, the blessing and the curse, which I have set before you, and you call them to mind among all the nations where the LORD your God has driven you, and return to the LORD your God, you and your children, and obey his voice in all that I command you today, with all your heart and with all your soul, then the LORD your God will restore your fortunes and have mercy on you, and he will gather you again from all the peoples where the LORD your God has scattered you. (Deut 30:1–3)

In the Book of Judges this pattern of sin, trouble, revival, and restoration is repeated at least five times (Judg 3:9, 15; 4:3; 6:6–7; and 10:10). 

Later during the period of the exile of Judah to Babylon, mourning becomes prominent as the first of two parts in a lament. A lament starts with grief, but ends in praise. Jeremiah, the Mourning Prophet, wrote  the  Book of Lamentations; we also read many lamentations in the Psalms, as in: 

Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD! O Lord, hear my voice! Let your ears be attentive to the voice of my pleas for mercy! If you, O LORD, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? But with you there is forgiveness, that you may be feared. (Ps 130:1–4)

The heart is first emptied of bitterness; then, it opens to God (Card 2005, 19). This lament form also appears in the Second Beatitude, where Jesus says—“Honored are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.” (Matt 5:4).

This mourning over sin, godly grief, appears as Jesus begins his journey to the cross (2 Cor 7:10). In the same way that God mourned over sin when preparing the great flood, Jesus mourns over the hardness of heart of the Pharisees on the Sabbath:

And he said to them, Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill? But they were silent. And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, Stretch out your hand. He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him. (Mark 3:4-6)

Here when Mark writes about the hardness of heart, he is comparing the Pharisees to Pharaoh (Exod 4:21).

The narrative in Mark 3 is also significant because it explicitly links human suffering to sin and God’s grief. Mark 3 “is the only passage in the gospels where Jesus is said to be angry. (Elliott 2006, 214). Jesus gets angry, because “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath” (Mark 2:27) and he cares about the well-being of people more than he cares about Sabbath observance (Lester 2007, 14–16, 106).  Because Jesus cares about suffering people, we should too.

Reference

Card, Michael. 2005. A Sacred Sorrow: Reaching Out to God in the Lost Language of Lament. Colorado Springs: NAVPress. Elliott, Matthew A. 2006. Faithful Feelings: Rethinking Emotion in the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel. Lester, Andrew D. 2007. Anger: Discovering Your Spiritual Ally. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press. Younger, K. Lawson. 2002. The NIV Application Commentary: Judges and Ruth. Grand Rapids: Zondervan.

Lament over Sin

Also see:

Preface to a Life in Tension

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Lamento sobre Pecado

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Los que siembran con lágrimas, 

segarán con gritos de júbilo. 

(Ps 126:5)

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

La segunda Beatitud dice que los que lloran serán consolados, pero ¿por qué llora Dios? En Génesis, Dios se aflige por la maldad humana:

El SEÑOR vio que era mucha la maldad de los hombres en la tierra, y que toda intención de los pensamientos de su corazón era sólo hacer siempre el mal. Y al SEÑOR le pesó haber hecho al hombre en la tierra, y sintió tristeza en su corazón. (Gen 6:5-6)

El pecado humano entristeció tanto a Dios que envió el diluvio, ahorrando solo Noé, su familia, y dos de cada animal (Gen 6:7-8)

Los Libros de la Ley

En otras partes, los estudios de la palabra para el duelo que se usa en Mateo 5:4 en el griego, la asocian más a menudo con el luto por la muerte. Por ejemplo, Abraham llora sobre la muerte de su esposa, Sara (Gen 23:2), y José llora sobre la muerte de su padre, Jacob (Gen 50:3). Por contrario, los estudios de la palabra para llorar se usa en la Beatitud en Lucas (Luke 6:21) en el griego (no como en español), la asocia frecuentemente con oración en medio de sufrimiento.

Por ejemplo, un punto significativo en la vida de Moisés surgió cuando como un bebé lloraba yacer en la canasta flotando en el Nilo. Por eschar el lloro de Moisés, la hija del faraón se conmueve a rescatar y criar al niño como suyo, desobedeciendo el edicto de su padre para ahogar todos los niños hebreos—incluido Moisés (Exod 1:22, 2:6). Más tarde, Moisés llora al Señor en oración a sanar su hermana, Miriam, quien fue aflictivo con lepra, y ella se sana (Num 12:13). Por contrario, clamar en el sentido de lloriqueo o autocompasión evoca la ira de Dios (Num 11:10).

Los Libros de los Profetas

El foco de llorar cambia en los Libros de los Profetas de la muerte de una persona a la angustia—clamando por el destino del nación de Israel (e.g. Jer 8:18–19).

Israel clamaba al Señor en la angustia principalmente por los altibajos de liderazgo durante los quatro cientos años después de la nación salió Egipto. Durante estos años Moisés sacó a la nación de Israel de Egipto y Joshua llegó a la Tierra Prometida con un fuerte liderazgo carismático. Pero el liderazgo se debilitó como ellos entraron el período de los jueces cuando, como hoy día, “Cada uno hacía lo que le parecía bien ante sus propios ojos” (Judg 17:6). Durante el tiempo de los jueces, un ciclo de pecado,  problemas, avivamiento, y restauración se convirtió en el patrón normal (Younger 2002, 35). El punto cambio en este patrón surgió cuando la gente se volvió y lloró al Señor para que cumpliera sus promesas:

Y sucederá que cuando todas estas cosas hayan venido sobre ti, la bendición y la maldición que he puesto delante de ti, y tú las recuerdes en todas las naciones adonde el SEÑOR tu Dios te haya desterrado, y vuelvas al SEÑOR tu Dios, tú y tus hijos, y le obedezcas con todo tu corazón y con toda tu alma conforme a todo lo que yo te ordeno hoy, entonces el SEÑOR tu Dios te hará volver de tu cautividad, y tendrá compasión de ti y te recogerá de nuevo de entre todos los pueblos adonde el SEÑOR tu Dios te haya dispersado. (Deut 30:1-3)

En el Libro de Jueces, este patrón de pecado, problemas, avivamiento, y restauración se repite al menos  cinco veces (Judg 3:9, 15; 4:3; 6:6–7; and 10:10). Por ejemplo:

Cuando los Israelitas clamaron al SEÑOR, el SEÑOR levantó un libertador a los Israelitas para que los librara, a Otoniel, hijo de Quenaz, hermano menor de Caleb. (Judg 3:9).

Más tarde durante el período del exilio de Judá a Babilonia, luto se vuelve prominente como la primera de las dos partes  en un lamento. Un lamento comienza con duelo, pero termina en alabanza. Jeremías, el Profeta de Luto, escribí el Libro de Lamentaciones; también leemos muchas lamentaciones en los Salmos, como en:

Cántico de ascenso gradual. Desde lo más profundo, oh SEÑOR, he clamado a ti. ¡Señor, oye mi voz! Estén atentos tus oídos A la voz de mis súplicas. SEÑOR, si tú tuvieras en cuenta las iniquidades, ¿Quién, oh Señor, podría permanecer? Pero en ti hay perdón, para que seas temido. (Ps 130:1-4)

El corazón se vacía primero de amargura; entonces, se abre a Dios (Card 2005, 19). Esta forma de lamento también aparece en la segunda Beatitude, donde Jesús dice—“Honrados los que lloran, pues ellos serán consolados” (Matt 5:4).

Este luto sobre pecado, una piadosa pena, aparece mientras Jesús empieza su viaje a la cruz (2 Cor 7:10). En la misma manera que Dios lloró sobre pecado cuando preparó la grande diluvia, Jesús llora sobre la dureza de corazón de los fariseos por el sábado:

Y Jesús le dijo al hombre que tenía la mano seca: Levántate y ponte aquí en medio. Entonces Jesús dijo a los otros: ¿Es lícito en el día de reposo hacer bien o hacer mal, salvar una vida o matar? Pero ellos guardaban silencio. Y mirando con enojo a los que Lo rodeaban, y entristecido por la dureza de sus corazones, le dijo al hombre: Extiende tu mano. Y él la extendió, y su mano quedó sana. Pero cuando los Fariseos salieron, enseguida comenzaron a tramar con los Herodianos en contra de Jesús, para ver cómo lo podrían destruir. (Mark 3:3-6)

Aquí, cuando Marco escribe sobre la dureza de corazón, se compara a los fariseos con el faraón (Exod 4:21).

El narrativo en Marco 3 es también significativo por razon de vincula explícitamente el sufrimiento humano con el pecado y el luto de Dios. Marcos 3 “es el único pasaje en los evangelios donde se dice que Jesús está enojado” (Elliott 2006, 214).⁠1 Jesús se convierte enojado porque “el día de reposo se hizo para el hombre, y no el hombre para el día de reposo” (Mark 2:27) y él se preocupa por el bienestar de personas más que por la obediencia de Sábato (Lester 2007, 14–16, 106). Pues Jesus se preocupa por los sufrimientos, deberíamos también.

Notas

1 Mark 3 “is the only passage in the gospels where Jesus is said to be angry.” (Elliott 2006, 214).

Referencias

Card, Michael. 2005. A Sacred Sorrow Experience Guide: Reaching Out to God in the Lost Language of Lament. Colorado Springs: NavPress.

Elliott, Matthew A. 2006. Faithful Feelings: Rethinking Emotion in the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel.

Lester, Andrew D. 2007. Anger: Discovering Your Spiritual Ally. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

Younger, K. Lawson. 2002. The NIV Application Commentary: Judges and Ruth. Grand Rapids: Zondervan.

Lamento sobre Pecado

Ver también:

Gospel as Divine Template

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Sitio del autor: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net,

Sitio del editor: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Boletín informativo: http://bit.ly/Lent_2020  

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Maxwell Learns from Mistakes

Maxwell_review_20200304John Maxwell. 2013.  Sometimes You Win; Sometimes You Learn:  Life’s Greatest Lessons Are Gained from Our Losses.  New York:  Center Street.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

Working in enterprise risk management in the early years of the housing crisis, I observed that firms with good risk management cultures invested heavily in learning from their mistakes[1].  Consequently, John Maxwell’s title, Sometimes You Win; Sometimes You Learn, was obviously of interest.

Introduction

Maxwell is not a new face.  Maxwell is a prolific writer well-known for books on management and leadership.  When I went looking in 2008 for a book on leadership, for example, I settled on his book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2007)

Maxwell’s background as a successful pastor in San Diego, California (47) is intriguing.  Because pastors lead by example and primarily manage volunteers, they need to be experts at motivating people.  Maxwell is no exception. Maxwell states his purpose in writing as:  to help you learn how to learn—from your losses, failures, mistakes, challenges, and bad experiences (213-214).  He observes that:  A loss isn’t totally a loss if you learn something as a result (16).  He organizes his book around a list of virtues and other attributes:  humility, reality, responsibility, improvement, hope, teachability, adversity, problems, bad experiences, change, and maturity (18).  He also employs lists in each of his chapters to organize his thoughts.

Be Teachable

For example, Maxwell reports that teachability is a key attitude of a learner.  He defines teachability as:  possessing the intentional attitude and behavior to keep learning and growing throughout life (108).  Maxwell breaks teachability down into 5 traits of a teachable person and 3 daily practices. 

The 5 traits of a teachable person are:  (1) an attitude conductive to learning, (2) a beginner’s mind-set, (3) someone who takes, long hard looks in the mirror, (4) someone who encourages others to speak into their lives, and (5) someone who learns something new every day (109-118).  The 3 daily practices required to become more teachable are:  (1) preparation, (2) contemplation, and (3) application (119-122).  Because teachability is an attitude, it is something that we can clearly embrace in our personal and business lives.

Like a good pastor, Maxwell peppers his writing with stories about and quotes from people who illustrate his points.  One of his first and favorite is UCLA basketball coach, John Wooden (ix).  Maxwell likes to quote coaches, but he also quotes business leaders, pastors, presidents, authors, and personal acquaintances.  The use of stories makes his writing accessible; the citing of particular individuals makes his writing memorable.

Assessment

Maxwell inspires hope. The continuing high level of unemployment six years after the onset of the Great Recession has left a lot of American in despair, not knowing how to find work or, if they have work, how to improve the quality and pay of the work they have.  Maxwell’s book speaks into this despair.  Each of us can learn from our losses and bad experiences–the essence of hope is to see how our daily lives contribute to our plans for the future.  I found Sometimes You Win; Sometimes You Learn hard to put down.  I suspect that you will too.

Footnotes

[1]This was a major insight gained in a series of articles that I published a few years ago under the title: Can Bad Culture Kill a firm? (e.g. http://bit.ly/1i2zfGD)

Maxwell Learns from Mistakes

Also see:

Murrow Invites Churches to be Man-friendly

Scott Writes Pro Email Newsletters

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Lent_2020  
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Joy in Sorrow: Monday Monologues, Podcast on March 16, 2020

Stephen_W_Hiemstra_20200125b
Stephen W. Hiemstra 2020 (Ken Burtram Photography)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a prayer and reflect on Joy in Sorrow. After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on this link.

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Joy in Sorrow: Monday Monologues, Podcast on March 16, 2020

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Lent_2020

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