Believer’s Prayer

Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA
Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Heavenly Father,

I believe in Jesus Christ, the son of the living God, who died for our sins and was raised from the dead.

Come into my life, help me to renounce and grieve the sin in my life that separates me from God.

Cleanse me of this sin, renew your Holy Spirit within me so that I will not sin any further.

Bring saints and a faithful church into my life to keep me honest with myself and draw me closer to you.

Break any chains that bind me to the past—be they pains or sorrows or grievous temptations, that I might freely welcome God, the Father, into my life, who through Christ Jesus can bridge any gap and heal any affliction, now and always.

In Jesus’ previous name, Amen.

Believer’s Prayer

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Oración del Creyente

Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA
Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Padre de los cielos,

Creo en Jesucristo, el hijo del viviendo Dios, quien murió para nuestros pecados y fue resucitado de los muertos.

Entra en mi vida, ayude me a renunciar y llorar el pecado en mi vida lo que separa me de Dios.

Límpiame de este pecado, renueva tu Espíritu Santo dentro me hasta que no pecadare más.

Trae santos y una iglesia fiel a mi vida para ser honesto conmigo mismo y acercarme más a ti.

Rompe las cadenas que me atan al pasado, ya sean dolores, penas o tentaciones dolorosas, para que yo pueda acoger libremente a Dios, el Padre, en mi vida, que a través de Jesucristo puede cerrar cualquier brecha y sanar cualquier aflicción, ahora y siempre.

En el nombre preciosos de Jesucristo, Amén.

Oración del Creyent

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Preface to a Life in Tension

Life_in_Tension_revision_front_20200101“Be holy because I am holy 

says the Lord God.”

(Lev 11:44)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

When God enters our lives, we change. This change occurs as we increasingly reflect Christ’s divine image in our lives and the Holy Spirit works in our hearts and minds as we behold him (2 Cor 3:16-18). The Apostle Paul calls this process sanctification (Rom 6:19), which means that we accept Christ’s invitation to a lifelong journey to become more holy—sacred and set apart—and the Holy Spirit’s guidance along the way. As Christ’s church—the called out ones, our sanctification is a group activity and, like any activity where individuals  travel at their own pace, tension among believers is expected.

Introduction

Tension? What tension? Sanctification is necessary because we sin. Sin separates us from other people, from God, and from the person that God created us to be. Sanctification presumably reduces our sin, encourages us to abide in union with God and draws us closer to the person that God created us to be, but it also widens the gap between us and those resisting the Holy Spirit (1 Thess 5:19). Consequently, sin and sanctification can both potentially tense up all three relationships.

Tension comes up daily, as a pastor observes:

Would you drink from a dirty cup? No—of course not. If you were given a dirty cup, you would refuse the cup and ask for another.⁠1

Someone accustomed to clean cups immediately recognizes a dirty one. When we model our lives after Christ, we reveal our identity as Christians; we are set apart from those around us in tension with the world. As conscious image bearers, we naturally begin to share in the tension that exists between God and this world, which implies that how we live and how we die matters to God.

This tension that we feel is a subjective mirror image to three gaps that we can objectively describe. The first gap is within each of us and it describes the distance between our natural selves and the person who God created us to be. This gap can lead to humiliation in the eyes of the world and shame within us, as we realize how far we have fallen from God’s image for us. The second is gap is between us and others and it can lead to isolation, ridicule, and persecution, as we can no longer run with the crowd or accept its norms. The third is the gap between us and God created by sin can lead to feelings of fear, abandonment, and a loss of spiritual power, as we realize what it means to live without God’s presence and blessings.

Can you feel the tension created by these gaps—the shame, the isolation, and the fear? Can you imagine being persecuted for your beliefs? Are you okay with it or do you try to run away? How do we respond creatively to this tension?

Alone with these three gaps, we are lost; but in Christ we are never alone. Christ works in our lives to close these gaps through his reconciling example in life, his atoning work on the cross and his enabling gift of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit enables us by grace through faith to participate actively in our own sanctification while experiencing God’s peace in the midst of life’s tensions.

The Beatitudes

Early in his ministry, Jesus preached a sermon, a kind of commissioning service for his disciples. He advised his disciples to be humble, mourn, be meek, chase after righteousness, be merciful, be holy, make peace, be persecuted for the right reasons, and wear persecution as a badge of honor (Matt 5:1–11). Incredibly, in the middle of this sermon and in spite of expected opposition, Jesus says:

You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven. (Matt 5:14-16)

This parable about light offers two important insights for our understanding of tension. First, this passage makes no sense unless tension exists between darkness and light—light normally drives out darkness. Second, this passage alludes to the creation accounts where we read:

The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. . . . And God said, Let there be light, and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness. (Gen 1:2–4)

Creation involved creating light. The implication is that Christians who embrace tension with the world are participating in a second creation (or re-creation) event (2 Cor 5:17).

Recognizing Christ’s re-creative work in our lives, we participate through the power of the Holy Spirit, not only in our own sanctification, but in the sanctification of others. In other words, progress in reducing one gap in our lives affects the other two. (Nouwen 1975, 15).  Attending to the sin in our lives, for example, makes it easier to get along with others and helps us to be more receptive to the Holy Spirit. Likewise, reducing our gap with God helps us appreciate God’s love for those around us and sensitizes us to the corrupting power of sin in our own lives. In God’s economy is nothing is wasted.

Structure of the Book

In exploring the spiritual dimensions of tension in our lives, I reflect on the Beatitudes in Matthew’s Gospel. The Beatitudes introduce Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount and prioritize his teaching. Because the sermon serves as an ordination service for the disciples, the importance of the Beatitudes for the early church, Christian spirituality, and discipleship cannot be overstated.⁠2

The chapters in this book divide into three parts: tension with ourselves (part A), tension with God (part B), and tension with others (part C). Each part contains three of the nine Beatitudes found in Matthew’s Gospel (numbered from one to nine with decimal points identifying particular sections within them).

Four sections appear in each Beatitude. The first section focuses on understanding what Jesus said and how he explained it. The second section examines the Old Testament context for each Beatitude. The third section examines the New Testament context—how did the Apostles respond to and expand on Jesus’ teaching? And the final section applies the Beatitude in a contemporary context and how we should respond. Each reflection is accompanied by a prayer and questions for further study. Soli Deo Gloria.

Footnotes

1 Pastor Anthony K. Bones of African Gospel Church of Nairobi, Kenya (http://AGCKenya.org) speaking at Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon, Virginia on January 14, 2015. 2 Guelich (1982, 14) citing Kissinger (1975) reports that: “Matthew 5-7 [appears] more frequently than any other three chapters in the entire Bible in the Ante Nicene [early church] writings”.

References

Guelich, Robert. 1982. The Sermon on the Mount: A Foundation for Understanding. Dallas: Word Publishing.

Kissinger, W.S. 1975. The Sermon on the Mount: A History of Interpretation and Bibliography. ATLA 3. Metuchen: Scarecrow.

Nouwen, Henri J. M. 1975. Reaching Out: The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life. New York: DoubleDay.

Preface to a Life in Tension

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Prefacio de la Vida en Tensión

Vida_en_Tensión_front_20200102Porque Yo soy el SEÑOR su Dios. 

Por tanto, conságrense y sean santos, porque Yo soy santo. 

(Lev 11:44)

Por Stephen W. Hiemstra

Cuando Dios entra en nuestras vidas, cambiamos. Este cambio pasa por que reflexionamos más y más la imagine de Dios en nuestras vidas y el Espíritu Santo trabaja en nuestros corazones y mentes como el velo es quitado (2 Cor 3:16). El apóstol Pablo llama este proceso como santificación (Rom 6:19), que significa que aceptamos la invitación de Cristo hasta un viaje durante todo la vida a hacer más santo—sagrado y apartado—y bajo de la guía del Espíritu Santo por el camino. Como la iglesia de Cristo—los llamados, nuestra santificación es un actividad de grupo y, como cualquiera actividad donde individuos viajar por su propia paso, tensión entre los creyentes se espera.

Introducción

¿Tensión? ¿Cual tensión? Se necesita la santificación porque pecamos. Los pecados nos separamos de otras personas, de Dios, y de la persona que Dios nos creada a ser. Santificación presumiblemente reduce nuestros pecados, nos anima a permanecer en unión con Dios, y acerca nos más cerca de la persona que Dios nos creó para ser, pero también amplía la brecha entre nos y aquellos que se resisten al Espíritu Santo (1 Thess 5:19). Por este razón, los pecados y la santificación ambos pueden salir tension en los tres relaciones.

La tensión surge a diario, como un pastor observe:

Querría beber de una sucia copa?⁠1 Claro que no. Si uno seria dado una sucia copa, se rechazaría la sucia y pedir otra.

Alguien que esta acostumbrado a limpias copas inmediatamente reconocería una sucia. Cuando modelamos nuestras vidas sobre Cristo, mostramos nuestra identidad como Cristianos; apartamos de aquellos cerca nos en tensión del mundo. Como portadores de imágenes conscientes, naturalmente comenzamos a compartir la tensión que existe entre Dios y este mundo, lo que implica que la forma en que vivimos y cómo morimos es importante para Dios.

Esta tensión que sentimos es un subjetivo imagen reflejando a tres brechas las que podemos describir objetivamente. La primera brecha es dentro de nosotros y se describe la distancia entre nuestras personas naturales y la persona quien Dios creada nos a ser. Esta brecha puede conducir a la humillación a los ojos del mundo y la vergüenza dentro de nosotros, al darnos cuenta de cuán lejos nos hemos alejado de la imagen de Dios para nosotros. La segunda brecha es entre nosotros y los demás puede conducir al aislamiento, el ridículo, y la persecución, ya que ya no podemos correr con la multitud o aceptar sus normas. La tercera es la brecha entre nosotros y Dios creado por pecado que puede conducir a sentimientos de miedo, abandono y pérdida de poder espiritual, a medida que nos damos cuenta de lo que significa vivir sin la presencia y las bendiciones de Dios.

¿Puedes sentir la tensión creado por estas brechas—la vergüenza, el aislamiento, y el miedo? ¿Te puedes imaginar ser perseguido para tus creencias? ¿Estás de acuerdo o tratas de escapar? ¿Como respondemos creativamente a esta tensión?

Solo con estas tres brechas, estamos perdido; pero en Cristo nunca estamos solo. Cristo trabaja en nuestras vidas para cerrar estas brechas a través de su ejemplo reconciliador en la vida, su obra expiatoria en la cruz, y su don habilitador del Espíritu Santo. El Espíritu Santo permita nos por gracia a media de la fe a participar activamente en nuestro propia santificación cuando compartimos la paz de Dios en medio de las tensiones de la vida.

Las Bienaventuranzas

Temprano en su ministerio, Jesús predicó un sermon, lo que fue un tipo de servicio de comisión para sus discípulos. Aconsejó a sus discípulos ser humildes, llorar, ser mansos, perseguir la justicia, ser misericordiosos, ser santos, hacer las paces, ser perseguidos por las razones correctas y llevar la persecución como una insignia de honor (Mateo 5: 1–11). Increíblemente, en medio de este sermón y a pesar de la oposición esperada, Jesús dice:

Ustedes son la luz del mundo. Una ciudad situada sobre un monte no se puede ocultar; ni se enciende una lámpara y se pone debajo de una vasija (un almud), sino sobre el candelero, y alumbra a todos los que están en la casa. Así brille la luz de ustedes delante de los hombres, para que vean sus buenas acciones y glorifiquen a su Padre que está en los cielos. (Mateo 5:14-16)

Esta parábola sobre la luz ofrece dos ideas importantes para nuestra comprensión de la tensión. Primero, este pasaje no tiene sentido a menos que exista tensión entre la oscuridad y la luz; normalmente la luz expulsa la oscuridad. Secundo, este pasaje alude a las cuentas de creación donde leemos:

La tierra estaba sin orden y vacía, y las tinieblas cubrían la superficie del abismo … Entonces dijo Dios: Sea la luz. Y hubo luz. Dios vio que la luz era buena; y Dios separó la luz de las tinieblas. (Gen 1:2-4)

Creación implicó a crear luz. La implicación es que cristianos quien embracer tensión con el mundo están participando en una secunda creación evento (2 Con 5:17).

A reconocer el trabajo de crear en nuestras vidas, participamos  por medio del Espíritu Santo, no solamente en nuestra sanctification, pero también en la santificación de los demás. En otras palabras, proceso de reducir una brecha en nuestras vidas afecta las otras (Nouwen 1975, 15). Atendiendo al pecado en nuestras vidas, por ejemplo, facilita a relatar con los demás y abra nos también al Espíritu Santo. Igualmente,  a reducir nuestra brecha con Dios facilita a apreciar el ama de Dios para aquellos cerca nos y sensita nos al corrompiendo poder de pecado en nuestras propias vidas. En la economía de Dios nada es por nada. 

La Estructura del Libro

Al explorar las dimensiones espirituales de tensión en nuestras vidas, reflejo por las Bienaventuranzas en el Evangelio de Mateo. Las Bienaventuranzas introduce el Sermón de la Monte de Jesús y priorizan a sus enseñas. Debido a que el sermón funciona como un servicio de ordenación para los discípulos, la importancia de las Bienaventuranzas para la iglesia primitiva, la espiritualidad cristiana, y el discipulado no puede ser exagerada.⁠2

Las capítulos de este libro se dividen entre tres partes: tensión con nosotros mismo (parte A), tensión con Dios (parte B), y tensión con los demás (parte C). Cada parte contiene tres de las  nueve Bienaventuranzas se encuentran en el Evangelio de Mateo (numerado de uno a nueve con puntos decimales a identificar secciones particulares dentro de ellas.

Cuatro secciones aparecen para cada Bienaventuranza. La premier sección se enfoca en entendimiento lo que Jesús dejó y como explicarlo. La secunda sección examina el contexto de cada Bienaventuranza del Antiguo Testamento. La tercera sección examina el contexto del Nuevo Testamento—que respondió los Apóstoles a la enseñanza de Jesús? Y la sección fínale aplica la bienaventuranza a uno contexto contemporáneo y como debemos responder. Cada reflexión esta acompañado por una oración y preguntas para más estudiar.

Soli Deo Gloria.

Notas

1 Pastor Anthony K. Bones de African Gospel Church de Nairobi, Kenya (http://AGCKenya.org) hablando a Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon, Virginia por 14 enero, 2015.

2 Siguiendo Kissinger (1975), Guelich (1982, 14) reporta que: “Mateo 5-6 aparece más frecuentemente que cualquier otra tres capítulos en la Biblia entera en la escritas de la Iglesia primitiva.” (“Matthew 5-7 [appears] more frequently than any other three chapters in the entire Bible in the Ante Nicene [early church] writings”.

Referencias

Guelich, Robert. 1982. The Sermon on the Mount: A Foundation for Understanding. Dallas: Word Publishing.

Kissinger, W.S. 1975. The Sermon on the Mount: A History of Interpretation and Bibliography. ATLA 3. Metuchen: Scarecrow.

Nouwen, Henri J. M. 1975. Reaching Out: The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life. New York: DoubleDay.

Prefacio de la Vida en Tensión

Also see:

Preface to a Life in Tension

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/XXXmas_2019  

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New Year’s Look-back: Top Ten Posts on T2Pneuma.net in 2019

JumpingTop 10 Posts on T2Pneuma in 2019

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Title

Views
2 Corintios 9: El Don Espiritual de la Generosidad 259
Stone and Duke Encourage Theological Reflection 247
Friedman Brings Healing by Shifting Focus from Individuals to the Family 192
Gálatas 2: Judios y Gentiles 178
Juan 17: La Oración de Intercesión 174
Nouwen: Make Space for Self, Others, and God 126
Prayer Against Dark Shadows 92
Gagnon: Bridging the Bible and Gender Confusion, Part 1 91
1 Corintios 12: Los Dones Espirituales Apuntan al Espíritu Santo 89
Benner Cares Spiritually Through Dialogue—Part 1 85

Observations

From time to time it is helpful as an author to assess who reads your posts and which posts are most popular. Shown above are the ten most popular posts for the year ending December 21. A couple of observations stand out on this list.
  1. My most popular post this year was a Bible study written in Spanish. In fact, four of the top ten posts were Bible studies written in Spanish. Meanwhile, no Bible studies written in English made the list.
  2. Half of the posts on the list were reviews of spirituality and theology books. None of my secular book reviews made the list.
  3. The only other category of writing on the list was a prayer. None of my reflections and none of my podcasts made the list.
  4. None of these posts were written in 2019. This either suggests that my writing was under par in 2019, which I do not believe, or that search engine optimization (SEO) plays a key role in discoverability—search engines rate older posts higher than new posts, perhaps because they are better linked.
How did you do in 2019? What will you remember most about this year? Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

New Year’s Look-back: Top Ten Posts on T2Pneuma.net in 201

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/XXXmas_2019  
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Heart Leadership: Monday Monologues, December 30, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a  prayer and reflect on Heart Leadership.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Heart Leadership: Monday Monologues, December 30, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/XXXmas_2019

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Prayer from a Christmas Heart

LPC_Christmas_tree_208By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Merciful and Loving Father,

All joy and thanksgiving begin with you “for while we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom 5:8).

Our hearts need not remain broken for with you, there is hope.

Pity those who have no confessor, for whom every day is gray and every night brings terror and guilt and shame.

In confessing Jesus is Lord and releasing our sins, our hearts can rejoice and be filled with praise.

Thank you, Lord, for Christmas! May we celebrate the birth of the Christ childthe unwanted baby born in poverty and obscurity who saved the world.

In the power of the Holy Sprit, may we be ever ready to share your Gospel of love for the healing of hearts and minds.

In Jesus’ precious name, Amen.

Prayer from a Christmas Heart

Also see:

Prayer for Healthy Limits 

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From the Heart

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Living in ChristBy Stephen W. Hiemstra

Christian leadership often begins with a broken heart. In Mark’s Gospel we read:

When he went ashore he saw a great crowd, and he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. And he began to teach them many things. (Mark 6:34)

How do you react to seeing friends and family trapped in needless sin and pain?

Moving the Heart

The call to action in many of my essays starts with citing statistics on suicide, often a result of despair and loss of hope. For me, suicide is personal because I lost my first best friend as a kid because his father shot himself to death and the family moved away. For those of us able to experience joy because of the hope we have in Christ, suicide is needless because it indicates a lost opportunity to share the joy we have. What moves you to take action?

Technical and Adaptive Change

Heifetz and Linsky’s (2002, 14, 18) distinguish technical from adaptive challenges. In a technical change, authorities apply current know-how to solve a problem while in an adaptive change people with the problem must learn new ways to solve the problem. A technical change typically requires nothing more than additional budget while an adaptive change requires an entirely new approach, often the need to change not things but ourselves.

This distinction between technical and adaptive changes is helpful because making technical changes when adaptive change is needed is the classic bureaucratic ruse to show progress in an organization sliding downhill. Grabbing for “low hanging fruit” is safe and permits the manager to petition for increased budget without asking for other sacrifices or convincing anyone to change how they approach their work. In a church context, this is like the annual appeal for members to bring a friend to church as a response to declining membership.

The Aging Congregation

Adaptive changes are required when something fundamental needs to change. Consider the aging white congregation located in what has now become an Hispanic or African-American neighborhood. I tell my kids—you better get used to making new friends because when you get older your old friends have a nasty habit of dying off. Asking members to invite a friend to church is probably not going to stimulate a lot of new members at this church. An adaptive response might be to plan holding events for the new neighbors—something harder; something riskier. Christian leaderships often requires difficult heart work before any real action can be taken.

References

Heifetz, Ronald A. and Marty Linsky. 2002. Leadership on the Line:  Staying Alive through the Dangers of Leading. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

From the Heart

Also See:

Value Of Life

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Hemingway’s Fish Story Classic

Hemingway_review_20191130Ernest Hemingway. 2003. The Old Man and the Sea (Orig Pub 1952). New York: Scribner.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

What do you do to relax? Has your mode of relaxing changed as you have grown older? Although I mostly vacation now with a good book and a quiet place to read it, when I was young my favorite pastime was fishing with my grandfather. For me, it was time outdoors with him; for him, fishing meant a freezer stocked with healthy meat to get through the winter.

 Introduction

In his novella, The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway introduces us to a man much like my grandfather, who fishes to put food on the table and, because it is not going well, must live off the charity of others, particularly his young companion. In Hemingway’s first paragraph, we read:

“He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish. In the first forty days a boy had been with him. But after forty days without a fish the boy’s parents had told him that the old man was now definitely and finally salao, which is the worst form of unlucky, and the boy had gone at their orders in another boat which caught three good fish the first week.”(9)

So the old man is not only hungry, he is alone and being treated as a pariah in the fishing community in Havana, Cuba. Sword fishing is a dangerous profession for a young man; for an old man working alone, the risk can be life-threatening between the unpredictable weather, normal challenges of old age, and the wiles and brute strength of large game-fish. This is one determined old man.

The Father-Son Relationship

The relationship of the old man and the boy is special, like a father with his son. We read:

“Can I go out to get sardines for you tomorrow?

No. Go and play baseball. I can still row and Rogelio will throw the net.

I would like to go. If I cannot fish with you, I would like to serve in some way.

You bought me a beer, the old man said. You are already a man.” (12)

The boy started fishing with the old man at age five. Interestingly, neither the old man nor the boy are given a name until late in the book suggesting that Hemingway is inviting us to see ourselves in these characters.

Character Self-Image

The old man’s hero is the New York Yankee baseball legend, Joe DiMaggio—when I knew him, he had retired from baseball and became the spokesman for Mr. Coffee, an electric coffeemaker. Writing in 1952, the year before I was born, we read in Hemingway:

“Tell me about the baseball, the boy asked him.

In the American League it is the Yankees as I said, the old man said happily.

They lost today, the boy told him.

That means nothing. The great DiMaggio is himself again.” (21)

Just like the old man has not caught any fish in the three months, DiMaggio is having a bad day. From the many references to DiMaggio, we are left to believe that the old man sees himself as the Joe DiMaggio of sword fishing.

Plot Overview

The old man sails deep into the ocean. Late in his voyage, he hooks a large sword fish who drags his boat out to sea for three days. Later, the fish tires and the old man pulls him in cutting his hands on the fishline. He harpoons the fish that is longer than his skiff and lashes it to the boat. Before his can reach Havana, sharks devour all but the head of the fish leaving him nothing to sell to replace fishing gear destroyed or lost in his fight with the fish and the sharks. Invigored by the fight, the old man motors on and the boy disobeys his parents to return to fish with him.

Background

Ernst Hemingway (1899-1961) grew up in Oak Park, Illinois. After high school he became a journalist and later a war correspondent. The Old Man and the Sea received the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1953. It was later made into a feature film in 1958 starring Spenser Tracy.[1]

Assessment

Ernst Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea is a literary classic. I enjoyed it as a holiday read over Thanksgiving. Because Hemingway died of suicide, this book’s focus on the frustrations of old age is often linked to his ongoing depression. That is an unfortunate inference about this jewel of a book written when Hemingway was in his prime as an author.

Footnotes

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Hemingway.

Hemingway’s Fish Story Classi

Also see:

Fukuyama Understands Identity 

Vance Chronicles White Poverty in America

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Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

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Christmas: Monday Monologues, December 23, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

This morning I will share a Christmas prayer and reflect on Christmas.

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

Christmas: Monday Monologues, December 23, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/XXXmas_2019

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