Galatians 6: Parting Comments

Weights by Stephen W. Hiemstra
Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

But far be it from me to boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world (Galatians 6:14 ESV).

What makes a community?

The Apostle Paul’s closing remarks divide into two parts:  A series of proverbs (vv 1-10) followed by a restatement of the main theme of his letter (vv 11-18).

The proverbs can be summarized as:

  • Forgive and restore (v 1),
  • Bear each other’s burdens (vv 2-5),
  • Support your teachers (v 6),
  • You reap what you sow (vv 7-8), and
  • Keep on doing good works (vv 9-10).

These proverbs often pair mutual accountability and personal responsibility[1].

Paul highlights his summary of the letter by wrapping this summary in highly personal remarks.  Before the summary, he signs this letter by claiming that he wrote it with his own hand (v 11).  After the summary, he asserts his apostolic authority claiming that his body bears the marks of Christ (v 17)[2].

The summary then goes on to discuss those advocating circumcision.  Paul makes these points—they want to force circumcision to avoid persecution in spite of not following their own advice and to brag about their influence over you (vv 12-13)[3].  By contrast, Paul basically says—look, I only brag about the cross of Christ and about the scars on my own body, not yours (vv 14, 17).

If you have ever met an evangelist who pulled down his shirt to display the scars on his back from torture, then you know how persuasive Paul’s argument really is.

[1]Scot McKnight (The NIV Application Commentary: Galatians.  Grand Rapids:  Zondervan, 1995, 288) makes this point following John Barclay.

[2]The word for marks here—stigmata (στίγματα; v 17) is used nowhere else in the New Testament and only one other place in the Greek Old Testament (Song of Solomon 1:11).

[3]McKnight (1995, 299).

Questions

  1. How was your week? Did anything special happen?
  2. Do you have questions from chapter 5?
  3. What is a proverb?
  4. What does Christian admonishment and forgiveness look like? (v 1; also 2 Timothy 4:2; Titus 3:10)
  5. How do we bear each other’s burdens? (vv 2-5; Romans 15:1; 1 Corinthians 9:19-23)
  6. How does “bear one other’s’ burdens” (v 2) compare with “each will have to bear his own load” (v 5)?
  7. How do you interpret verse 6? What are the good things referred to here?
  8. Why the reference to sowing the flesh (spirit) and reaping the flesh (spirit)? (vv 7-8)
  9. What are the priorities in doing good works? (vv 9-10)
  10. Why does Paul make a point of showing his own handwriting? Why big letters?  (v 11; 1 Corinthians 16:21)
  11. One author notes that Paul’s proverbs pair mutual accountability and personal responsibility? Would you agree?  What are some examples?
  12. What is the motivation of those trying to promote circumcision? (v 12)
  13. What is Paul’s point in verses 13-14?
  14. What implications do you see today from Paul’s comment on circumcision in verse 15?
  15. What is Paul trying to say in verse 17? Why?

Galatians 6: Parting Comments

Also see:

Galatians 5: Healthy Boundaries 

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2zRkNMJ

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Galatians 5: Healthy Boundaries

Fruits by Stephen W. Hiemstra
Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness,

goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control;

against such things there is no law (Gal 5:22-23 ESV).

An interesting conversation going on in missionary circles concerns the definition of a Christian.  Is a Christian someone who has been baptized and confirmed?  Or, is a Christian someone has consistently grown closer to Christ as a disciple?  While only God knows truly who is saved, the definition of a Christian is important in understanding the role and articulation of the institutional church.  This is particularly a problem in non-western countries where persecution threatens both life and livelihood.

In Paul’s ministry among the Galatians, the question of who is a Christian was upfront and personal.  Is a Christian a sect within Judaism or an independent faith?  Being circumcised identified one with the Jewish faith, but in the first century it more importantly marked one politically as a Jewish nationalist.  And it was also not just something that your wife would notice.  Entry into the temple in Jerusalem required a ritual bath (purified, e.g. Acts 24:18) and sports in the gentile world were also frequently practiced “in your birthday suit”!  Both activities made circumcision a public event in a way that we might overlook today.

How does Paul answer the question of who is a Christian?  Ironically, Paul stands with Moses when he said:  Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart (Deuteronomy 10:16).  In Paul’s words:  For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision counts for anything, but only faith working through love (v 6).  Neither Moses nor Paul accepted the idea that by itself circumcision placed any claim on God.  Faith working through love, as Paul says, speaks to changes in the heart.

Paul’s comments have immediate application in our cultural environment.  In our context, Paul would say:  neither baptized nor unbaptized; neither communicant nor non-communicant; counts for anything.  Going through the motions to join a church does not count.  The question remains: is your heart moving closer to Christ or not?

Movements of the heart might seem rather private but this does not imply that one can be a Christian incognito (secret Christian).  Our freedom in Christ is freedom to love our neighbors as ourselves (v 14).  Do you think that your neighbor will notice?  If money and time are involved, do you think your spouse would notice?  How about your kids?

In drawing healthy boundaries, Paul offers both a list of vices (vv 19-21) and a list of virtues (vv 22-23).  Interestingly, while the list of virtues will not guarantee admission to heaven, practicing the vices will keep you out (v 21).  In Paul’s mind, grace includes law, but is not limited by it.

Questions

  1. How did the snow affect your week?
  2. How was your week? Did anything special happen?
  3. Do you have questions from chapter 4?
  4. What is freedom; what is slavery in Paul’s eye? (v 1)
  5. What is Paul’s point about circumcision and the law? (vv 2-6)
  6. What does Moses say about circumcision? (Deuteronomy 10:16-17) Why does he talk about bribing God?
  7. Why does circumcision require the whole law be obeyed? (v 3; Deuteronomy 27:1-3)
  8. One interpretation of Paul’s, advocated for example by Charles Finney (The Spirit-Filled Life (Orig pub 1861). New Kensington:  Whitaker House. 1982), was to compare grace to pledging guilty before a judge while law was like pledging innocent. Why is this legal analogy helpful?
  9. What is Paul’s argument in verse 7? (Hint: vv 7-11)
  10. What is the offense of the cross that Paul refers to? (v 11; 1 Corinthians 1:17-18)
  11. What is the freedom in Christ that Paul talks about? (vv 13-14) Can you be free in Christ and have no one notice?
  12. What does it mean to walk by the spirit or, alternatively, walk by the flesh? (v 16)
  13. How does the law and gospel relate? (v 18)
  14. What are the works of the flesh? (vv 19-21)
  15. How do the works of the flesh relate to salvation? (v 21)
  16. What are the fruits of the spirit? (vv 22-23)
  17. How does the cross of Christ relate to the works of the flesh? (v 24)

Galatians 5: Healthy Boundaries

Also see:

Galatians 6: Parting Comments 

Galatians 4: Slave and Free 

Christian Spirituality 

Looking Back 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter at: http://bit.ly/2zRkNMJ

Continue Reading