Dawn Widens Worship

Dawn_review_20191003Marva J. Dawn.[1] 1999. “A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time: The Splendor of Worshipping God and Being Church for the World. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans.

Review by Stephen W. Hiemstra

One of the great disappointments in seminary arose when I took my only worship class and the professor insisted on studying the worship requirements outlined in the Book of Order (the denomination governance manual). It was like taking a class in oil painting only to be given a canvas outlined in a paint-by-numbers schema. Nothing quenches the spirit (1 Thes 5:19) quicker than a programmatic church.

Introduction

In her book, A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time, Marva Dawn writes:

“Surely one of the greatest problems of our times is that we have become so nonchalant about the Lord of the cosmos. Certainly, if we were more immersed in God’s splendor we would find ourselves thoroughly lost in wonder, love, and praise.” (7)

In theological terms, we have lost our sense of God’s transcendence and prefer a “buddy god” that we can hang with on Sunday morning and forget about the rest of the week—my paraphrase. Dawn goes on to say:

“My primary concern in various churches’ and denominations’ struggles over worship is that so many decisions are being based on criteria other than the most essential—namely that God be the Subject and Object, the Infinite Center, of our worship.” (8)

Having lost its center, Dawn observes:

“Church has been turned into a place, a building, a duty, an hour on Sunday mornings, rather than what we are as ‘those called out’ (ekklesia) by Christ into a way of being in the world to the glory of God for the sake of others.” (9)

When the church’s center is God, the musical forms, the liturgy, and the mode of dress simply recede in importance.

Background and Organization

Marva Dawn received her doctorate in Christian ethics at University of Notre Dame. At the time she wrote this book, she was a seminary professor and the author of numerous books. She has since retired. Dawn writes in six parts:

  1. For the World: Culture
  2. Worshiping God: The Splendor of Our Infinite Center
  3. Being Church: Building Community
  4. Being Church: Forming Character
  5. Being Church: Choices
  6. For the World: Challenges (vii-viii)

Each part begins with a sermon, accept for the introduction where the theme sermon follows the introduction. This sermonic focus loosens the integration of the book, giving it an eclectic form and feel.

Wasting Time

Dawn’s thematic sermon takes Colossians 3:12-17 as its text. A key phrase in this reading is: And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts” (Col 3:15 ESV). Dawn applies this text seriously when she reminds us:

“And it [worship] is a royal waste of time because we have to die to ourselves and our egos, our purposes and accomplishments to live now in God’s kingdom.” (14)

For Dawn, wasting time in worship is, in other words, sacrificial, our way of participating in Christ’s crucifixion. This is much like the Apostle Peter’s observation: He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed.” (1 Pet 2:24 ESV)

In my own view, I see worship as a way of participating in the divine rest in creation. We are where God intends us to be, something often hard to achieve in this life.

Assessment

Marva J. Dawn’s A Royal ‘Waste’ of Time left a lasting impression on me in seminary as I came to see worship differently. In worship, we come to praise and adore God that we might become acquainted with the image we were created to reflect. True worship is more than the musical selections and their performance. Seminary students and pastors are best positioned to understand her detailed examination of contemporary worship controversies.

Footnotes

[1] http://MarvaDawn.org/about_Marva

Dawn Widens Worshi

Also See:

Bonhoeffer Introduces Christian Ethics, Part 1 

Top 10 Book Reviews Over the Past 12 Months

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/ID_2019

 

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The Spiritual Discipline of Work. Monday Monologues, March 4, 2019 (podcast)

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

In today’s podcast, I will share a sermon entitled: The Spiritual Discipline of Work. (Spanish)

After listening, please click here to take a brief listener survey (10 questions).

To listen, click on the link below:

Hear the words; Walk the steps; Experience the joy!

The Spiritual Discipline of Work. Monday Monologues, March 4, 2019 (podcast)

Also see:

Monday Monologue On March 26, 2018 

Other ways to engage online:

Author site: http://www.StephenWHiemstra.net, Publisher site: http://www.T2Pneuma.com.

Newsletter: http://bit.ly/Lent_2019

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The Spiritual Discipline of Work

Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018
Stephen W Hiemstra, 2018

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Preached in Spanish at Luncheon for the Soul, Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon, VA. February 27, 2019


Introduction

Good morning. Welcome to Luncheon for the Soul. My name is Stephen W. Hiemstra. My wife, Maryam, and I live in Centreville, Virginia and we have three grown children. I am a Christian author and volunteer pastor.
 
Today’s theme is the spiritual discipline of work

Invocation

Let’s pray.

Holy father. Draw us to yourself this morning. Open our hearts; illumine our minds; and strengthen our hands in your service. In the powerful name of Jesus. Amen.

Scripture

Today’s scripture reading comes from Colossians 3:23-24. Hear the word of the Lord:

“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ.” (Col 3:23-24 ESV)

The Word of the Lord. Thanks be to God.

Story

What was your favorite job and what activity was totally horrible?

In my work as an economist, many times I have said that about one in three years were good. Two years in three were bad because of changes in management or conflicts among managers in the middle of a project. When priorities change in the middle of a project, it is impossible for the project to be a success from the perspective of leadership. It does not matter that the work was extraordinarily good because the office was constantly stressed out and promotion was nearly impossible over many years.

For this reason, today’s scripture reading is particularly meaningful to me. We work for the Lord and not for men.

What was your favorite job y what activity was totally horrible?

Lesson

Every time there is pain or stress in our lives, we have a decision: are we going to turn to God and give it over to Him or are we going to turn into the pain and we feel sorry for ourselves? This second alternative is sometimes known as idolatry.

The gravity of the sin of idolatry is obvious because our faith, time, energy, and money point to the things that we really worship (Giglio 2003, 113). The center of these activities may be in our work—in or out of the church; in or out of the home. Work can many times be a source of stress, fear, and anxiety.

Jesus understands (2X). At one point, he described a scene of lilies and kings. Afterwards, he advised:

And do not seek what you are to eat and what you are to drink, nor be worried.For all the nations of the world seek after these things, and your Father knows that you need them. Instead, seek his kingdom, and these things will be added to you.”(Luke 12:29-31 ESV)

In other words, work is important, but the Kingdom of God is more important.

As God designed it, work has dignity. The Bible begins showing a God who works—he creates (Welchel 2012, 7). God’s only son worked with his hands as a carpenter. Thus, when we work with our hands work also has dignity. Remember that almost all of the disciples worked as fishermen—do you think that they return home smelling like lilies? One of the most radicals things that Jesus did was to eat and drink with working people (Mt 11:19).[1]

Paul’s attitude about work was significant for two reasons. First, our work for human bosses is also work for God (Col 3:23-24). Second, many times we work for brothers and sisters in Christ—the family of God. Would you want to disrespect your family? (Phlm 1:16 ESV)

One of the most influential writers of the church historically was a veteran who worked in a kitchen. He did not write very much, but he dedicated his work daily to God in prayer. Brother Lawrence (1982, 23) wrote:

“We should offer our work to Him before we begin and thank Him afterwards for the privilege of having done it for His sake.”

He simply applied the advice of Paul to “pray without ceasing”(1 Thess 5:17) and the spiritual giants of his day beat a path to his door.

One method for spotting prospective idolatry is to ask about your identity. When you are introduced to a new neighbor or maybe someone at a party, how does your spouse introduce you? Is it by your marital status, favorite sports team or profession?

What keeps you busy? (2X)

Prayer

Let’s close with a Word of prayer.

Loving father, we praise you for giving us useful work to do. We praise you for equipping us for work in your church. Thank you for giving us new eyes to see our work, our bosses, and our responsibilities. The harvest is ready. Prepare us to assist the laborers. In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen.


[1]This citation comes from the parable of the brats, one of my favorites (Matt 11:16-19).

References

Giglio, Louie. 2003. The Air I Breathe.Colorado Springs: Multnomah Press.

Lawrence, Brother. 1982. The Practice of the Presence of God(Orig Pub 1691). New Kensington, PA: Whitaker House.

Whelchel, Hugh. 2012. How Then Should We Work? Rediscovering the Biblical Doctrine of Work.Bloomington, IN: WestBow Press.

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The Spiritual Discipline of Work

May 001Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ.  (Colossians 3:23-24 ESV)

Stephen W. Hiemstra, Luncheon for the Soul, Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon, Virginia, September 17, 2014

Prayer

Merciful father. Beloved Son. Spirit of Truth.  Thank you for your presence among us this morning.  Thank you for the food that we have eaten and the hands that prepared us.  Open our hearts now to receive your word.  Silence any voice in our minds except yours.  Inspire the words spoken and illumine the words heard.  In the precious name of your son, our Lord, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

Opening Words

Who do you work for, really? (2X)

As some of you know, I used to work in construction during the summer as a student years ago.  Of the many things that I did, a particular job in McLean, VA comes to mind when I think of those days.  It was probably 1974 when I worked all summer to earn enough money to buy my first car—a used 1967 Volkswagen Beetle.

This job comes to mind because I met so many very colorful people and learned lessons that stuck with me.  I used to say that this job convinced me that I wanted to finish college and never again work construction.

Unlike today when there are many Hispanics in construction work, back then most people working around McLean, VA in those days were from West Virginia.  Many had police records.  In my workgroup—all day workers—there were two African Americans—one was quiet and the other was noisy.  The quiet one was arrested for robbing a bank at gunpoint; The noisy one used to chase me around with a razor.

My boss was not much better.  He thought it was funny to instigate fights among the men.  He went back to West Virginia one weekend and was arrested for getting drunk and shooting up someone’s trailer.  Normally after payday, he would hang around, drink, and play cards until any workers present lost their entire paycheck.  My boss was not much better.

In the middle of all this stuff, I got rather depressed. One morning I could not take it any longer.  I skipped work and spent the day in the museum of art downtown.  The next day my boss let me go.  But first, he gave me some advice—at the next job site you go to, bring along your tools, and tell them that you are a carpenter’s helper.  Later that morning, I did that on another job site and received not only a job but also a higher salary.

Who do you work for, really? (2X)

Scripture

Our scripture passage today is taken from Paul’s letter to the church at Colosse, an agricultural town about 110 miles east of Ephesus in what is now modern Turkey (Garland 1998, 17-33).  Commentators believe that Paul wrote this letter from Rome where he was under house arrest.  Paul writes this letter having heard that the church was faithful (vv 1:3-4), but has also been under pressure from false teachers, probably teachers trying to convince them to return to Judaism (vv 2:8-19).   In response to this pressure, Paul writes to them about the sufficiency of Christ for salvation and for life (vv 1:17-20; 2:6-7).

In chapter 3 where our passage is then focuses on the sufficiency of Christ.  Paul writes: Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth (Colossians 3:2 ESV).  He then proceeds to explain how to do this in practice.

The immediate context of our verses is a section referred to by scholars as the household codes where Paul gives advice to husbands, wives, parents, children, and slaves—every member of an ancient household (vv 3:18-22).  Our verses then provide the general principle or summary statement of Paul’s teaching:

Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ (vv 3:23-24).

In some sense, our attitude in our work summaries Paul’s letter and a key focus of our lives in Christ.

Who do you work for, really? (2X)

Spiritual Discipline

The gravity of idolatrous sin is obvious. If our loyalty, time, energy, and money point to what we really worship (Giglio 2003, 113), then the heart of idolatrous activity has to be our work—inside or outside the church; inside or outside the home. Work is often also a source of stress, fear, and anxiety.

Jesus understands. At one point, he presented a word picture of lilies and kings. Then, he advised: “do not seek what you are to eat and what you are to drink, nor be worried . . . Instead, seek his kingdom, and these things will be added to you.” (Luke 12:27–31) In other words, work is important; the kingdom of God is more important.

Work, as designed by God, is endowed with dignity. The Bible opens with God working—he creates (Welchel 2012, 7). God’s only son did manual labor! If Christ worked first with his hands as a carpenter, then working with our hands also has honor. Most of the disciples worked as fishermen—do you think they came home smelling like lilies? One of Jesus’ most radical acts was table ministry—he ate and drank with people who worked for a living (Matt 11:19).

The Apostle Paul’s attitude concerning work is significant in three ways. First, our work for human supervisors is also work for God! (Colossians 3:23–24). Second, many of the people that we work with and for are brothers and sisters—family—in Christ. How can anyone disrespect family? (Phlm 1:16). Impossible! Unthinkable! Third, Paul himself supported himself with manual labor as a tentmaker (Acts 18:2-3).

One of the church’s most important spiritual writers was a disabled veteran who worked in a kitchen. He hardly wrote anything at all. But he committed his work during the day to God in prayer. Brother Lawrence (1982, 23) wrote: “We should offer our work to Him before we begin and thank Him afterwards for the privilege of having done it for His sake.” He simply applied Paul’s advice: “pray without ceasing.” (1 Thessalian 5:17) And, the spiritual giants of his day beat a path to his door.

One measure of the idolatrous potential of work is to ask about identity. When you meet a new neighbor or someone at a party, how does your spouse identify you? Is it by your marital relationship, by your favorite sport’s team, or by your profession?

As Christians, our identity is in Christ.  Work has dignity because we worship a God who demonstrated the dignity of work in creation and everything that can thereafter.

Who do you work for, really? (2X) As Christians, we know how to answer this question.

Prayer

Loving Father. We praise you for giving us useful things to do. We praise for equipping us for work in your church. Thank you for giving us new eyes to see our work, our supervisors, and our primary responsibilities. The harvest is ready; prepare us to join the laborers. In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

REFERENCES

Garland, David E.  1998. The NIV Application Commentary:  Colossians/Philemon.  Grand Rapids:  Zondervan.

Giglio, Louie. 2003. The Air I Breathe. Colorado Springs: Multnomah Press.

Lawrence, Brother. 1982. The Practice of the Presence of God (Orig Pub 1691). New Kensington, PA: Whitaker House.

Whelchel, Hugh. 2012. How Then Should We Work? Rediscovering the Biblical Doctrine of Work. Bloomington, IN: WestBow Press.

 

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