2 Corinthians 11: Boast in the Lord

MrPersonalityFor if someone comes and proclaims another Jesus than the one we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit from the one you received, or if you accept a different gospel from the one you accepted, you put up with it readily enough. Indeed, I consider that I am not in the least inferior to these super-apostles. (2 Corinthians 11:4-5 ESV)

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

What does it mean to be an authentic Christian leader?

The Apostle Paul’s ministry came into question in Corinth for at least two reasons:  1. Paul focused on teaching rather than eloquent speaking (v 6) and 2. Paul was a volunteer evangelist (v 7).  Today, in some denominations Paul would be considered a lay pastor while others might call him a church planter.

Senior pastor of mega church—I don’t think so!  Paul was not a polished speaker and traveled with a scribe, not a worship team.  His manner of pastoral care would probably result in disciplinary action or dismissal in many mainline denominations.  The sarcastic tone displayed in this chapter might easily have been cited as a major reason—ever rob another church to support your volunteer work? (v 8).

Paul shames his adversaries in Corinth with his boasting.  A polished speaker today, as then, might be introduced citing academic credentials, the television programs hosted, important posts held, even titles earned, family background, and friends vacationed with—when the name dropping begins. And, of course, who could miss the Armani suit?

What does Paul brag about? Family heritage, number of arrests, beatings, whippings, stonings, shipwrecking, perils suffered, sleepless nights, hunger, thirst, exposure to the elements, and anxieties for the church (vv 22-28).  Echoed in the words of Paul are Jesus’ own words:  “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel’s will save it.” (Mark 8:34-35 ESV)

So what was Paul’s motivation for “putting himself out there” for the Corinthian church?

Paul writes:  For I feel a divine jealousy for you, since I betrothed you to one husband, to present you as a pure virgin to Christ (v 2).  In other words, Paul thinks of himself as the father of the bride who, oh by the way, introduced his daughter to her future husband.

For Paul, authenticity as a Christian leader means modeling Christ to the church through lifestyle ministry and teaching.

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1 Corinthians 11: Identity and Unity in Christ

Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra
Art by Stephen W. Hiemstra

By Stephen W. Hiemstra

Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ (v 1).

One of the greatest challenges of our times is to find our identity in Christ, solely in Christ.  Many other voices cry to be heard; sometimes demanding total allegiance without warrant.  Whenever these voices win, we find ourselves denying Christ in some aspect of our lives and end up practicing idolatry.  The Apostle Paul cautions us to imitate him as he imitates Christ (v 1).

In chapter 11, Paul focuses on two areas of contentious debate in the church in Corinth (and our own churches):  gender (vv 3-16) and class (vv 20-34) relationships within the church.  In beginning to discuss these verses, it is helpful to remember that Paul has repeatedly emphasized our unity in Christ:  There is neither Jew nor Greek [cultural equality], there is neither slave nor free [class equality], there is no male and female [gender equality], for you are all one in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:28 ESV).  The questions at hand explore how to maintain order and respect within a context of our equality before God.

The social context of Paul’s comments on gender is frankly not well understood and confusion about how to translate Paul’s instructions has led to conflicting advice followed by different churches and denominations.  The common lectionary simply skips over these verses.  Notwithstanding, Hays[1] (183) notes 4 points about gender relationship which are well-understood:

  1. Paul endorses the freedom of women to pray and prophesy in the assembly; the only question is what sort of headdress is appropriate…
  2. The patriarchal order of verses 3 and 7-9 is set in counterpoint with a vision of mutual interdependence of men and women…
  3. The passage does not require subordination of women…but a symbolic distinction between the sexes.
  4. The immediate concern of the passage is for the Corinthians to avoid bringing shame on the community.

Paul’s more lengthy discourse on the relationship between husbands and wives in Ephesians 4:22-33 basically prescribes men to love their wives and women to respect their husbands in a context of equality before God.  What this means in the context of communal worship is basically that neither party should flaunt their independence or sexuality in dress or conduct in a manner that would embarrass the other or the community.  Obviously, a lot more could be said about this subject.

Paul’s comments about classism in the church’s celebration of communion probably come as a surprise to those accustomed to reading this passage causally.  This is because the communion practice in serving communion is to skip over the context of Paul’s comments which have 4 parts:

  1. Paul observes divisions and factions in the church (vv 13-19);
  2. Paul accuses the Corinthians of not celebrating communion properly because some eat and some go hungry;  some get drunk and some have nothing (vv 20-22);
  3. The words of institution (vv 23-26); and
  4. Warning about improper celebration of communion (vv 27-34).

The key verse here is: For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself (v 29).  What does it mean to discern the body?  At a minimum it means that communion is taken together; more importantly, it means that the celebrant needs to consider the needs of the community (unity and equality) before taking part in communion—communion is a communal event.

If our identity is in anything other than Christ (culture, class, gender, race, and so on), then taking part in communion invites God’s judgment.  When we remember Christ, we should not have other things in our minds or on our hearts.

Footnotes

[1] Richard B. Hays. 2011.  Interpretation:  First Corinthians.  Louisville:  Westminster John Knox Press.

Questions

  1. How was your week? Did something in particular?
  2. What questions or thoughts do you have about 1 Corinthians 10?
  3. Does verse 1 fit better with chapter 10 or 11? Why?
  4. What is the focus and point of imitating Paul? (v 1)
  5. What is ironic in Paul’s statement in verse 2?
  6. Why might verse 3 be controversial? What is Paul’s point?
  7. Why is Paul interested in head coverings? (vv 3-7) Should we be concerned?  What is the point here?
  8. What is Paul point of reference in making comments in verses 8-12? (Genesis 3:7, 18-25)  Does birth order matter to us?  Did it matter in Paul’s day?  Why?
  9. Why is Paul concerned about hair length and covering? (vv 13-15)  Does it matter today?
  10. Is your answer to question 9 affected by verse 16 or does verse 16 belong with what follows?
  11. Are the divisions that Paul mentioned in verses 18-19 because of hair, coverings, or communion (vv 20-22?
  12. How are the Words of Institution for communion (vv 23-26) affected by the context before and after?
  13. What is Paul’s warning in verses 27-32? In particular, what does the expression—without discerning the body—mean?
  14. What does Paul recommend in verses 33-34? Why? Is this all about food and drink?

1 Corinthians 11: Identity and Unity in Christ

First Corinthians 12

First Corinthians 10

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